Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Je viens de terminer une lettre."

Translation:I have just finished a letter.

5 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jesnekl

I am so confused. How did I miss that "viens de" translates to "just?" Why wouldn't it be "I come to finish a letter?" Can anyone help?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickDaniel1

I made the same mistake. Where was this secret lesson about "viens de"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kavindad1
kavindad1
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4

Think of it as "I am coming from finishing a letter," so "I have just finished a letter."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbie21144

That is a good way to look at that construction, thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bizworld

Thanks. That helps

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kinogo

Thanks.. It's clear now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron-mendonca

"Venir de" is simply a fixed expression meaning to have just __. My french teacher would say it all the time. It is the french equivalent of "acabar de" in case any spanish learners were having trouble with this too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eduard830406

Thank you for referring to the Spanish translation "acabar de", with that explanation I now understand "venir de".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Symph0nee
Symph0nee
  • 14
  • 10
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

There wasn't one. You have to read sitesurf's or others' replies to find it:p

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
  • 18
  • 18
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

Indeed!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giaokim
giaokim
  • 25
  • 12
  • 6
  • 2
  • 41

Venir is one of the most common French verbs. It is irregular in conjugation and literally means "to come." It is also used in some idiomatic expressions and to conjugate the recent past. - Venir means "to come" in most senses that verb is used in English. Il vient à midi = He's coming at noon. Je viens de Paris = I'm from (I come from) Paris.

  • the action that has just occurred (Venir de + infinitive) Je viens d'arriver = I (have) just arrived. Ils viennent de manger = hey just ate.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally410

Not many people seem to have stopped by on this page. I really hope that they have because this is a very useful construction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxy
galaxy
  • 16
  • 6
  • 2

Why not "I just finished a letter"????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristaSantos

It's accepted now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianaevans

Exactly! In previous lessons the "je viens de" would translate as "just"!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/votears
votears
  • 16
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

yeah,viens de is the opposite time point to aller a

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sooz5002
sooz5002
  • 20
  • 18
  • 16
  • 12
  • 5
  • 4

How would one say "I'm just finishing a letter" please

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nordist
nordist
  • 23
  • 13
  • 10
  • 89

Je suis en train de finir une lettre. Voilà!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sooz5002
sooz5002
  • 20
  • 18
  • 16
  • 12
  • 5
  • 4

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gkmmccall
gkmmccall
  • 25
  • 24
  • 314

je viens de apprendre une chose nouvelle. Merci!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christiangd
christiangd
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 10
  • 78

Je viens D’Apprendre ;-)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smcnaugh

Hah! And i thought it meant "I am coming to the end of a letter"!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14

Close! It's almost "I have come to the end of a letter". From there it's easy to get to "I have just finished a letter".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghaith415370
ghaith415370
  • 25
  • 19
  • 15
  • 10
  • 4

Who remember the sentence ( je n'ai faim pas, je juste viens de manger) ?? It has the same structure of this sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3

This is clearly a handy expression in any language, and different languages seem to use the same "logic" to express the thought "to have just". French gives us venir de, and Spanish acabar de. Irish has "Tá mé (díreach) tar éis é sin a dhéanamh" which comes into English as " I am (just) after doing that" from English speakers in Ireland (= "I have just done that").

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/squigot

Can it be 'I just completed a letter'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikkylaw

@ Ghaith, why is 'juste' included in this sentence when 'viens de' means just?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KateKemp
KateKemp
  • 25
  • 7
  • 518

Why not 'I'm just finishing a letter?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alison257494
Alison257494
  • 25
  • 16
  • 11
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2
  • 32

"I just finished a letter" given as the correct answer sounds like sloppy English. "I have just finished..." or informally "I've..." sounds more correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrieleKa231335

I thought it is 'i am going to finish a letter'?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rapunzela2

That would be "Je vais à finir une lettre."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/okkam1

What's wrong with i just now finished a letter?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetBerry2

No just now would be used at end of sentence I finished it just now.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/okkam1

Even in perfect tense; I've just now finished a letter, what's wrong with just now?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetBerry2

Miszed this one

8 months ago