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  5. "Téann sí isteach sa teach."

"Téann isteach sa teach."

Translation:She goes into the house.

November 4, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

'Isteach' is best translated as 'inside', and 'isteach i' is best translated as 'into'. This idiom is found in Irish English where you'll have people saying things like 'she goes inside in the house'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Don't forget about istigh, for when you're already inside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Good summary, we've edited the tooltips in line with this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

...where I grew up, on the West Side of Chicago, we'd say, "go inside of the house".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

I feel like this is a tongue twister, lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

I did wonder if tu allan/mewn, 'out/inside' in Welsh had any connection with , 'house'. This sentence makes me think so


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

Why not an teach i thought sa teach was her house


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

As it was explained (I think, Scilling or Knocksedan) in another discussion thread:

  • i = in
  • in = in + vowel
  • sa = in the
  • san = in the + vowel
  • sna = in the + plural

for the full story, please take a short look at

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/i.

(her house would be "a teach")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

thank you I am so grateful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

The audio sounds like .. 'isteach a teach' to me but after what Ciat says, i guess 'isteach i' is the way it's said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

The audio says teann


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

When do you pronounce 's' like in English (eg Irish "sa") and when do you pronounce it like "sh" (eg Irish "isteach")? Is the subsequent vowel relevant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1343

Consonants have broad and slender pronunciations. They are broad when the adjacent vowels are broad (a, o, u) and slender when the adjacent vowels are slender (e, i).

Broad s is "ss", slender s is "sh".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

'sa teach' rather than 'sa theach' ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1343

sa is derived from ins an and is still treated as though it ends in n when it comes to the DeNTaLS-DoTS exceptions.

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