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  5. "Kinder zahlen einen Euro."

"Kinder zahlen einen Euro."

Translation:Kids pay one euro.

November 5, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/htirah100

Doesn't zahlen means to count and bezahlen means to pay?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salomee_e

To count is zählen, ich zähle Zahlen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beneficium

Like Dagmar said, zählen means to count, while zahlen and bezahlen mean to pay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie.Baxter

I would also like to know how to differentiate between the uses of bezahlen and zahlen. I've seen Burg used to mean "pay"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luna98x

I dont think there is a difference in usage for "zahlen" and "bezahlen".

The only thing that comes to mind is that in some serious scenarios (for example buying a new car) you would be more likely to hear "bezahlen" because it is slightly more polite.

I for example use "zahlen" more often because I speak rather fast; it is faster to say instead of "bezahlen" .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelikaManga

Children pay one euro is the sames


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelikaManga

"Children pay one euro" is the same as "kids pay one euro". I think you should check this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gadonny

Why isn't it "An Euro"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallingerp

Because in English "euro" it is pronounced [ˈjʊroʊ]. Since it starts with a consonant the correct article is "a". I made the same mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williamliggett

The letter e is a vowel not a consonant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beneficium

He meant it begins with a consonant sound (the semivowel j). What matters is the sound, not the spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul

The letter e is a vowel not a consonant.

Letters are neither vowels nor consonants. Those terms refer to sounds. That s why it is a hero but an hour, regardless of what you think of letter "h".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williamliggett

Also it doesn't matter how it is pronouned it is how it is spelled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NayutaIto

Is it one euro each or one euro in total?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salomee_e

It is 1 euro each.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShlomoRosen

There is no difference between the slow and the fast dictation in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NayutaIto

Is "count" acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

No. Zählen (with the umlaut over the a) is the word for "to count".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaRidge

The translation I have is . I had assumed that would translate as because it's a declined article and that is probably a valid translation. My query is whether should be declined when it's being used as a number (ein, zwei, drei) or whether I am overthinking this. I suspect is just the declined article and is the given translation as it sounds more natural in English. But just in case I am missing something about numbers ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WandaGraha

So if I pronounce it German inflected, it is 'an Euro'. If I pronounce it English inflected it is 'a (j) euro'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanAceved795887

children pay one cent, was marked wrong! I am missing something


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapnDoug

Yes, one euro is (currently 2020-10-11) $1.18 USD not one cent.

So, if you were to translate it and convert the money to US it would be:
Children pay one dollar eighteen cents.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelikaManga

"Children pay one euro" is the same as "kids pay one euro". I think you should check this one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineS643315

Kids are baby goats! The answer should read 'children', not 'kids'!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMorand

Seriously, how am I supposed to know it is "a Euro"? This is pathetic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeHoughton1

Well it's basic English for a start, but to be fair I don't actually think many people would say "pay a euro", it would like always be "pay one euro" since it's more natural to say. The opposite to say "pay a quid" vs "pay one quid".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul

If you have ever encountered "a European [anything]", the answer is obvious, and if you have not - you must have been living under a rock.

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