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"No he sabido nada de él."

Translation:I have not known anything about him.

5 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bgravengood

I translated this as "I haven't known anything about him." because I knew that is how you wanted it. But it is bad English and should not be translated with the present perfect - it can only confuse the matter. It should be translated as "I didn't know anything about him", as it implies that you are speaking of something that was true until a specific moment in the past - the moment in which you met him.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola bgravengood: When you say "that is the way you wanted it", to whom are you talking? If you want to report that to Duolingo, you have to go to "Report a Problem". Otherwise, they will not accept any changes just from being here on this discussion forum.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"I did not know" is not a translation of "no he sabido," though. "I did not know" is a different tense. I think the idea here in the computer lessons is to show Duo that you understand the Spanish. We are dealing with computer generated sentences, and some do not translate well into good English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

computer translation is ' i did not not know' What sort of english is 'not not' ????

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Spanglish :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariagra
mariagra
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I have heard nothing from him.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmunnell

I translated as "I've known nothing" which is better English, though the sentence is ludicrous to begin with, but was marked wrong for "missing a word". Guess what? "I've known nothing" (my translation) = "I've not known anything" (Duolingo's translation). So the word I missed is "not" according to Duolingo. What foolishness!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenoraFlood

Best thing to do is to report. It's the only way duo will learn. I did the same thing with the sentence. reporting it now.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I got past the gate with--I have known nothing about him. That, however, is one awkward English sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lechuza-chouette
Lechuza-chouette
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mouseover told me "sabido" also means "tasted". Which would have made a grammatical sentence handy ...for cannibals.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glanrim

I was talking to my girlfriend (she's Spanish) she said the most accurate translation would be "I haven't heard anything from him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Glan: That is what Google Translate says, too. But how do we get "heard" from "sabido"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

By translating to colloquial English. The DL owl, on the other hand, is very, very literal minded :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iea.min
iea.min
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Shouldn't "I have not known anything of him" be correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

what are the rules for when to use NADA vs CUALQUIER. In my head I understand that using NADA is the correct word for the above sentence, but I dont know why. Memory maybe? How do I correctly know when to use which word. Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oowowaee

Cualquier means "any", whereas nada means "nothing".

When forming the double negative construction (which they use in Spanish) "I don't ... anything" => SUBJECT no VERB nada.

Similarly, "I never ..." is => SUBJECT no VERB nunca.

No tengo nada => I don't have anything. No cocino nunca => I never cook.

4 years ago