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"You eat an apple and you drink water."

Translation:Je eet een appel en je drinkt water.

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amanda.gro5

The je and jij confuses me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RODNEYSHAR1

What did I do wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhanly
dhanly
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What's the difference between using drink and drinkt? At first, I thought drinkt was drinks, rather than drink.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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They are different conjugations of the verb drinken:

  • ik drink
  • jij/u drinkt (drink jij)
  • hij/zij/het drinkt
  • wij drinken
  • jullie drinken
  • zij drinken

Drinks doesn't exist in Dutch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happydays69

Greay, so whats the rule then, in english please.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I listed the conjugations for the Dutch verb drinken, that simply is the Dutch equivalent of this:

  • I drink
  • you (singular) drink
  • he/she/it drinks
  • we drink
  • you (plural) drink
  • they drink
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GwenSander2

i think drinkt means both

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephanie.374
stephanie.374
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Should this be "je....en jij..." or "je...en je..." or "jij....en jij..."? Which sounds most natural? I suppose I'm also confused about je and jij!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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That depends on the context. If you are pointing to person A with the apple and person B with the water, then jij…jij (so with emphasis). If it's about one person then it can be either jij…je or je…je, it depends if you want the emphasis on the person. It is odd/awkward to use jij more than once when referring to the same subject, because the emphasis has already been determined, so it's overkill to keep on emphasising the same subject. IT IS LIKE USING TOO MANY CAPS. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/colec49

What is 'u'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Help._.

The formal version of you

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesGrant9

U = you

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abigail.j.c

On and earlier question I put jij drinkt and it was wrong, so think time i put jij drink and it too was wrong. Does the context of the question or the surrounding words change which word to use?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lily145892

Why is there different words for one word (you)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14
Ister14
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Well, as I understand it there are 4 different words for you in Dutch: Je - singular you unstressed Jij - singluar you stressed U - singular you, formal Jullie - plural you To be more specific - Je is a typical usage in a normal conversation (most typical situation). Jij is used to emphasise the role of a person. U is used in official speech (it's like a bit like adding Sir in English) As I'm still more than newbie to the language, please someone verify this..

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annec108766
Annec108766
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Je eet een appel en je drinkt water

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gluestick5

Why is it drinkt not drink? I thought that drink means drink (eg. Je drink water, you drink water) and drinkt means drinks (eg. Hij drinkt melk, he drinks milk). Now I am very confused, what have I gotten wrong?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ister14
Ister14
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No, the suffix -t is added to verb stem in singular form except for:

  • 1st person
  • question (invertion) for 2nd person.

As you can see most 2nd person singular sentences will have -t, just like in this sentence.

3 months ago