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  5. "Bladet kommer fra Danmark, m…

"Bladet kommer fra Danmark, men det er engelsk."

Translation:The magazine comes from Denmark, but it is in English.

November 7, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidijan

Anglification. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Or maybe Denmark’s way of increasing its soft power?...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calcastor

Is this actually a common thing? lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeusttu

I think there are lots of internationals in Denmark, plus almost everyone speaks English, so it would definitely make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckiDucki

Being that in my English speaking country people publish magazines in Greek, Japanese, Swedish, Danish, Spanish and more, I wouldn't be suprised.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1004.cjstk

I wish we had Danish/Swedish/Russian/Japanese magazines! English gets boring :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica1694

i agree i would use although here, not but


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnJohnNL

Nice "comparison excercise".... NOT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiXLHH

Why is Danmark capitalized here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arielkangaroo

Countries are capitalized in Danish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pegamush

the mouseover pronunciation for "bladet" sounds funny


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bigfella88

You can't offer "the sheet" as a translation and then mark it as wrong. I'm sorry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasperHorn

Can you leave out "det" in this sentence?

Duo doesn't allow "[..] men er på engelsk", but it feels right to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnJohnNL

No, you can't, because the English version uses it too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

"blad" means "leaf (of a flower)", "magazine" and also "sheet (of paper)". It's exactly the same in German "Blatt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zet955992

Why is it 'på engelsk', not something like 'i engelsk'? på feels a little out of place in this context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidijan

That's just how it's said. Prepositions often aren't so very logical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littleuni

"i" would mean "inside" in this context and would therefore not be correct. "In" in English, when translated into danish can mean both "i" and "på", depending on the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaakiraal

The your English speaking people are not use other language magazines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica1694

in english you would never say.... but it is in english, you would say... although it is in english... how do you say that in danish....tak


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arielkangaroo

As a fellow native English speaker, I disagree. You would absolutely use "but" here, not "although".

"But" is used to introduce something contrary to what you have previously said, so it makes perfect sense here. You would normally expect a magazine from Denmark to be in Danish, but, contrary to that expectation, it is in English.

"Although" means "despite the fact." So it would make no sense if you switched it out for "but", but it would make sense if you put it at the beginning of the sentence like this: "Although (despite the fact that) the magazine is from Denmark, it is in English".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WahahaDrills

As another native English speaker, I disagree completely. "But" is perfectly logical and makes complete sense here.

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