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  5. "You cook dinner if he works."

"You cook dinner if he works."

Translation:Du laver aftensmad hvis han arbejder.

November 7, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickDaSilva

What's the difference between "hvis" and "om"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraO768193

Im actually hoping that someone answers this question in a way i can read from my app because it makes no sense to me and im wrong 50% of the time because i cant acces that link and im just guessing at this point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod
  • 5

This post might help you out a bit. There is also a collection of posts (still under construction) if you go into the discussions page, and under "Popular" it should be towards the top with "Sticky" next to it, called The Danish Collection (Overview of Threads) [Please Read]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esidereo

thank you very much for this link


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eagorelick

Would "Du koger aftensmad hvis..." sound weird to a native Danish speaker? What's the general distinction between "koger" and "laver"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tddk

"koge"=boil. "Lave"=make. So yes, "du koger aftensmad" does sound weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimDunno

But isn't 'koge' also 'cooking'? Therefor it sounds quire normal to me, but then again, I'm not a native. I'll ask my native friend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedebygade

No, "koge" only means boil, not cook.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyclOrBit

ah, ok. Strange that the translator give is as "cook" as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sijette

what if you prepare some pasta for dinner, or maybe en krabbe ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MMuhr

I put koger instead of laver and just got a message popping up that says something like "koger literally means to boil and not to cook". Is this new? Either way, awesome!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LillaMy94

One of the options was "Du laver middag hvis han arbejder", and I choose both options and, apparently, got it wrong. Is "middag" really a wrong translation for "dinner"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaneTR

Nope, it isn't, especially elderly people use middag about aftensmad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlahor

"Middag" sounds like a lunch to me, something you eat at midday, is my logic correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod
  • 5

Your logic is somewhat correct. Danes used to eat their "middag" around lunch time. This was a hot meal and the main meal of the day, however as modern working hours came in, it became increasingly difficult to have middag at midday, and so it got pushed into the evening but managed to keep its name (unfortunately I can't seem to find my source for this now)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tamara575565

What is the diferent between OM and HVIS in this sentence. i can not open the link with the ansewer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zeganjo

I thought hvis meant whose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meriko1980

why can't it be "du lav mad..." - the imperative form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PierrePoutine

In Danish you cannot put "du" or other pronoun before the imperative form of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeusttu

Somehow i occasionally confuse hvis and når... I know they're pretty distinct but I think I've had one of them wrong in my head for over a year >.>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claytonsiddens

Why is arbejbe not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valka_Ironside

Because it's the infinitive form of the verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tms323391

Error flagged: Instead of aftensmad it wanted "middag", which is Swedish. Today this happened several times on different occasions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranciscaAniba

every time you cheat you give me a million dollars.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bultokki

Koger or laver? I can't understand the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeusttu

I think koge means boil, not cook. Not 100% sure though so someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Edit: just saw someone already asked your question, and a native Dane gave the same answer, so looks like I'm right :3

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