"One time per year."

Translation:Una vez al año.

5 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ramcoh

Why "vez" and not "tiempo"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

tiempo is the notion of time in general, vez has the idea of an occurrence or occasion

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryJesus

yerp that sucker got me,

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azulta

It seems to me that it depends on the intent of the sentence. If the intent is to say "one time a year is New Year's Eve" then you are talking about the condition of time. If you are talking about the condition of an episode, then it would be "vez". Frankly, I think the sentence calls for further context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chururup

Can it not be 'una vez cada ano' ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethJohn

Yes I too wrote una vez cada año

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffithschool

Are there differences in saying "Una vez por ano" versus "Una vez al ano"? I noticed they were both accepted, and I wondered if they have different inflections.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilleehsi
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why "por" and not "para?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gdenho00

por = per, for, through, etc. para = for, in order to, etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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What helped me guess this was remembering percent is por ciento in Spanish. Looked it up and yep, that's one of the direct translations of por!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nymeria7

Why 'una' and no 'un?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Vez is feminine

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JLafitte

How do we know that? It doesn't end with an a. Just one of those things?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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You just have to learn them as you go. -o and -a endings are usually a good clue (not always though! Like el día) and there are some other patterns as well, like words ending in -ción are usually feminine. But yeah, you need to memorise this stuff.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

johnn- this isn't a rule, you have to learn a new word with its article.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scapo
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and where do I learn that? By loosing my last heart in a lesson and doing that over again just because they didnt provide me with viable mean to know what they ask for? Gosh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

In Spanish and in French, we have to learn the gender when we learn a new word at school, because there isn't any rule. You just have to remember it, so, continue to put downvotes and don't take the advice of anybody. Blame it on yourself if you can't remember such a simple advice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scapo
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Why so judgmental? I haven't said anything against studying or not taking advices. I simply complain about the fact that there was no possibility to have it right on the first go. If there is a word for the first time in a lesson how can I already know? I would love to learn that and then have it right...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happycat1

why is it al not por

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drgrimy

"Una vez por ano" is also correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seelian
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por la día = every day, per year y not por el año?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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I forget what I typed, but it had por in it and I got it right, so it accepts more translations than just 'una vez al año'.

If you're talking about the articles, as far as I know the phrase is either una vez al año or una vez por año, una vez a la semana or una vez por semana, una vez al día or una vez por día. Either al/a la or por. Isn't 'every day' cada día or todos los días?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isabera

una vez todos los años ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PersonRocca

And here it takes "ano" without the circumflex, but not before.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Sometimes it'll let accent errors slide (especially in timed practice) but not always, especially when they're crucial.

Ano means something different from año:
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=ano
You should probably avoid mixing those two up ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PersonRocca

Actually, I disagree with you that a distinction is necessary. In English we have many words which are written exactly the same way, yet have completely different meanings, and I doubt that anyone will mix up the two meanings if at some later point the language evolves in such a way that the circumflex is lost. Thats not to say that people shouldn't use the circumflex, but its not necessary that I can see.....I understand the difference, however I just wish it was consistent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Si se puede - if it's possible
Sí se puede - it's allowed

Most of the time yeah, context will get you through, but there are definitely times where the accent is important for clarity, if not outright crucial to conveying the right meaning. (Not saying my example up there is the best...)

Either way, it's better to learn to write correctly - dropping accents where they should appear is at best incorrect by the Official Rules, and at worst it could completely change the entire meaning, like with conjugated verbs. I'm not sure why it lets stuff slide, maybe it's because you were at a lower level? It does it in timed practice too, since you're under pressure, but in the general questions you should treat it as a reprieve if you get away with it! Look at the correction it points out and try to get it perfect next time

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PersonRocca

Languages evolve, and the circumflex accent is already going into disuse by online spanish speakers. There is no such thing as "official rules" or "perfect" in language. The english language we speak today is nothing like what was called "English" even 400 years ago. Ambiguity is inevitable, and though we should try to avoid it, I dont think anyone will ever mistake the "ano" words, especially since I believe them to be pronounced the same way. Only time will tell. If I significant amount of times, in my discourse with Spanish speakers, this distinction gives rise to confusion, I will return to faithful circumflex accent use. I may use the circumflex in the future to humor this site, but I disagree with the premise that Im "getting away" with anything by following the examples of native Spanish internet speakers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Yeah you can't reply because we're too many layers of comments deep.

The model language is, basically, the 'official' dialect that the course is trying to teach you. It's the set of vocabulary and grammatical rules that constitute a 'correct' version of Spanish. I'm using the scare quotes because, like you say, language isn't set in stone, other dialects and variations are equally valid, but when learning 'Spanish' you're focusing on a specific subset of those. Duo is here to teach you 'correct Spanish', which is what the majority of Spanish speakers would recognise, and that means enforcing specific rules - including the accents.

Spanish is even more particular in this regard because that official language regulation body does exist - you can arbitrarily reject it if you like, but it provides a pretty clear model of 'correct' Spanish that's at least close to what most people speak. It's not like English where there's no authoritative source, and people purely refer to convention and various people claiming their way should be the right way.

Accents affect pronunciation, but they also inflect verbs for tense. Hablo is 'I speak' (present indicative) and habló is 'he/she/usted spoke' (preterite past indicative), they're said differently (the stress falling in different places) and they obviously have very different meanings. Same for hablé (I spoke, preterite indicative) and hable (3rd person imperative command, 'speak!', and subjunctive). They're a fundamental aspect of Spanish grammar, and Duo requires you to learn them. If you don't want to, you're going to get a lot of questions wrong (and misunderstand sentences completely).

I wasn't trying to insult your Spanish, I'm a learner myself - I was just going off your current level and the fact you're making, no offence, some very naïve comments and assumptions about the language. I don't doubt that your friends drop accents (although how would you know when they should be there?) and that you can communicate just fine with imperfect Spanish, it happens in English too. I talk to non-native speakers and understand them just fine, and I don't constantly correct them unless they ask me to. But either way, like I said I'm trying to help you out here - if you want to use this site, which is incredibly helpful by the way (speaking from experience), you'll need to learn this stuff properly. Maybe later on you'll feel the same way and decide to drop accents, but at least you'll know what you're doing

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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Actually Spanish is a language that does have an official body that sets down the rules:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_Academia_Espa%C3%B1ola
I'm in no way a prescriptivist, but when there's an accepted standard way to speak and write a language, that's what a general course should aim to teach you. If you want to break those rules later, then all power to you, but you should at least know how to do things 'correctly'. You've seen how people type in English on the internet, right? There's nothing inherently wrong with 'non-standard' English - I use it myself in different situations - but it shouldn't actually be the model.

Another reason to follow the rules at the start is because you don't understand the reason for them, so you're not in a position to say they don't matter. Like your example, año and ano are not pronounced the same way at all. If you don't know how to pronounce ñ yet (it's a separate letter too), then no offence but you're not ready to make the kind of assumptions you're making. Do you know the difference between hablo and habló, in terms of meaning and pronunciation? If you're not prepared to learn where the accents fall and why you're really going to struggle later.

I'm just trying to save you a lot of frustration and relearning later. And even if you don't accept any of this, the fact is that Duo will be very picky about accents, so if you want to use the site you'll have to deal with that happening

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PersonRocca

apparently I am not allowed to respond directly to you, telemetry, so I will do it this way. A language cannot choose a group of officials to set down the rules, so if you choose not to necessarily accept this "official body", as I do, then nothing horribly bad is going to come of it. What is the "model" for a language? I argue that it is how people speak it. I understand why the stated organization exists, but I do not think it's necessary to follow it exactly. I do know the difference between n and nn, (If im remembering correctly n is the English "n" but the nn is pronounced like the English "ny") but I made a mistake. Maybe you could explain the reason for the falling of accents? I already stated that I will write it like the site asks me to, so you are actually restating what I said as if you contradicted me.....You seem to assume that I have a poor knowledge of Spanish, which I think you are in no position to do. I communicate with Spanish online speakers and they do not use, or complain about my disuse of the accent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

personrocca- Don't forget that sometimes the sentence becomes weird if you don't use the accent, and it can change the meaning of the word. Even the stress when you speak , if you put it on the wrong syllable, you say another word.

4 years ago
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