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  5. "Tager du afsted?"

"Tager du afsted?"

Translation:Are you leaving?

November 8, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Travis_

You could think of it as "Taking Leave" and just grammared... Danishly ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julius545105

I think it's easier to remember as "taking off"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EntropicJade

That helps a lot! Thank you, as english is not my first language I struggle sometimes to find a twist to Danish in English (so much easier than in my first language). Are you taking THE LEAVE??? So that's the option you're choosing, HUH! (hahaha ok now I won't forget hehe)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sopzeh

I had the multiple choice one for this. Could "are you off?" not be accepted as it means are you leaving in English just an informal expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davidhoz

Would "are you taking a leave" be correct in this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedebygade

No, i would translate that to "tager du orlov", that is a long break from work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADrunkenPirate

I put 'You are leaving'? and it was wrong, yet the answer is 'are you leaving'? ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orfeocookie

Because Duolingo ignores punctuation in your answer, and "You are leaving" is a statement, not a question. You might get away with it in speech by having a rising inflection, but Duolingo isn't tolerant of that particular quirk of non-standard English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeyalexa

Because "you are leaving" is saying that the person is leaving in a question but "are you leaving" is asking if the person is leaving. They are different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/janetthrush

I have just done the same thing. Frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annamari537057

Me too. I don't like this system!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allison23215

So that's where the expression "take your leave" comes from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giamil3

Dunno why you were voted down; seemed kinda gratuitous. In any case, the expression's equivalent in German would be "Abschied nehmen" = "to take leave (of someone) or, quite simply used in the sense of "To say goodbye". Another way of saying "to say goodbye" or "to bow out", is the reflexive verb "sich verabschieden".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
  • 2332

I don't know about the common origin. The 'schied' in 'Abschied' means 'to separate', while 'sted' in 'afsted' means 'place'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giamil3

You're right! They aren't related. I realized about sted as in "place", but I thought that somewhere down the line, way back in Indo-European, sted/stad and Scheid/schied had an common origin. Now I know. So thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariamisMi

I think abshied would translate into afsked. Its to leave or say goodbye to someone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atcovi

So..

Am I leaving? = Tager jeg er afsted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
  • 2332

Nej, 'tager jeg afsted'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzannaWaldorff

Speaker siger afsted med tryk på af som i afsked. I afsted ligger trykket på sted


[deactivated user]

    How often does this construction occur in spoken Danish? Is there another verb for this?

    (Just out of interest)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamWDuncan

    Akin to 'are you taking off'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianne1970

    I believe everything have explanation grammatically talking but other languages have insides particular ways and sometimes we just need learn by heart...i mean believe your ear will get use to it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UNBALANC3D

    "Are you taking your leave" should be accepted, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koran822325

    can one also say "skal du ud?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mijichu

    Why is "are you taking leave?" incorrect? It's formal English and the literal translation....

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