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  5. "Min bedstefar er halvtreds."

"Min bedstefar er halvtreds."

Translation:My grandfather is fifty.

November 8, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WingedPanda

ikr... min far er halvtreds


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiryatJos

Then you are the young one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WingedPanda

Haha jeg er tretten... :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SafiaZad

Min far også !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fraser690912

Jeg er halvtreds


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snommelp

Wait, so... treds is sixty, and halvtreds is fifty? How does that work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristo-

I think it's the same like saying half to five in English about time - if taking half literally, it should be 2.5 (half past two...). Same in Danish about numbers - it is half way to tres from forty. Danish counts numbers in 20s not 10s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod
  • 59

It's more because it's abbreviated from "Halvtredsindtyve" which (for obvious reasons) became a bit long and a nuisance but meant "2½ x 20". (Also note, halvtredje isn't often used for 2½ anymore either, one would just say "to og en halv")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daddyyak

isn't it from "halv tre snes" from the word meaning 20 (snes)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb
Mod
  • 59

I have had Danes say that to me, but I'm just going by what the textbooks I've read and the dictionary say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shanne11

thank you, you really are such a big help with excellent explanations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleJDahl

Sounds like a numbering system invented by a calculus professor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElliottPet4

Makes about as much sense as french numbers 70-99 "Sixty-ten" "Four-twenties-nineteen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

Why is it halvtreDs (with d) but tres without the d?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Probably for the same reason that "four" is spelt with a 'u' but "forty" isn't: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Number words tend to develop very differently sometimes, even though they derive from the same root. Even more so in a language with silent letters, so that's probably what happened.

EDIT: Okay, I looked it up: halvtreds is a short form of halvtredsindstyve, which in turn consists of the parts halvtredje (two and a half), sinde (times), and tyve (twenty). Halvtredje literally means "third half" (it's the third after "one half" (halv) and "one and a half" (halvanden)). Tres is short for tresindstyve, "three times twenty".

So the 'd' comes from the difference that the "tred" in halvtreds stands for "third", and the "tre" in tres means "three".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skywalker735

Halvtredje = 3rd ½ (halv = ½, tredje = third) I read this It means that what number goes before ½ of the 3rd? It would be 2½, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

That is right. It's half-three, which accounts to 2½. Like in some countries where people say the time as 'half four' when it's 3:30.

EDIT: apparently that "half four" thing isn't commonly done in English-speaking countries. But you can find it in continental Europe, like in Denmark: "Det er halv fire" - "It is 3:30." (literally "half four").

Some British speakers actually one-up this and talk about the half hour after the hour, i.e. they call 3:30 "half three".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johann484578

Autocorrect changed fifty into dirty...

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