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"You have added two lemons."

Translation:Tu as ajouté deux citrons.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Carlms3
Carlms3
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Now I'm not complaining, but I've been getting the feed from L'actu en Patates and I've seen contractions with tu, is this common? Ex. T'as, t'es

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Arjofocolovi
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These contractions are only used in very informal French. It should be accepted in my opinion, as long as it's labeled as such to the learner (and I don't think there are currently any kind of labeling on answers).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hi, Arjo! I agree that some kind of rating would be extremely useful. Such as "one star" for informal, "two stars" for standard, "three stars" for formal. It would really help learners, IMO.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I feel like including every instance of informal language would be a bit of a strain on the authors. Would you include Verlans for example?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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I was just thinking out loud about this issue. I'm not saying that we need more slang, but perhaps a way to help learners know that one sentence is more (or less) formal than another way of saying the same thing. For example, when asking questions:

  • Inversion, e.g., "Voulez-vous partir maintenant ?" is more formal.
  • Using "est-ce que" before a declarative statement is considered "standard"
  • Using a declarative statement with a voice inflection to ask a question (informal)
  • Using a declarative statement (if an affirmative response is expected) followed by "n'est-ce pas ?" (also informal)

These variations are not presented in any way that the learner would ever know that one is more formal or less formal than another and may say them with complete disregard to the register they are using. Another example is that some really only use "tu" forms or use it interchangeably with "vous" or even mix them in the same sentence, e.g., Avez-vous ton livre ? (wrong). http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/questions.htm http://french.about.com/od/lessons/a/register.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
georgeoftruth
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Only in informal French. They tend to speak so fast that unnecessary vowel sounds are omitted. Here are more examples:

http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/informal.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HairyChris88
HairyChris88
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I think I'm spending too much time on Duo. The other day I just could not remember the English word for 'citron'. I was asking the very confused shop assistant for "you know, a citron, a yellow fruit...a citron..."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vincemat
vincemat
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I used "citrons" and got it right, but doesn't "limons" also work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The Oxford Dictionary lists "limon" as an outdated term referring to lemon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s-k-1-2
s-k-1-2
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I used limons and it is incorrect. I think limons are actually limes?

3 years ago