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"¿En cuál nivel estás?"

Translation:Which level are you in?

2
5 years ago

90 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MrFlibble57

"In which level are you?" seems to be perfect English and a direct translation. But no?

119
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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sounds good to me too. you should report it.

28
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Sorry, but I find that word order to be clumsy, unless of course Yoda you are.

19
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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The word order is proper grammar. Putting the "in" at the end separates the preposition from its object. While it's totally acceptable in spoken English it should be avoided it writing where longer sentences need stricter grammar to ensure the correct meaning.

47
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
hughcparker
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For years, the idea that one shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition has been seen as pedantic and archaic. The standard response when challenged on this has been "this is the sort of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put".

42
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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There is a difference between ending in a preposition and an adverb. In the sentence, "he won't shut up," we are ending in an adverb, since up has no object.
Ending a sentence in a preposition is still frowned upon in some cases. "Which level are you in?" is quite clear and does not need to be rephrased. It's when a sentence becomes longer that ending in the preposition can become unclear. You don't need to adhere to this rule, but thinking about it will help you construct better sentences.

(Edit) Since I can't respond to Dustley directly.

Actually he was avoiding it. That's why he moved up from the end. I realize it was an attempt at humor, but it also serves to confuse the issue.

Ending sentences in prepositions is fine the vast majority of the time when using the English language. However, there are times when doing so makes for an awkward unreadable sentence. I've seen it many times before when editing my students' papers. Awkward phrasing of any type should be avoided if the goal is communication.

(Edit 2) Since I can't reply to valencys directly

Hughcpacker's example had a preposition (with) and an adverb (up). You can move the preposition, if you want to adhere to the old rule,

This is the sort of example with which I will not put up.

This version is as correct as the original and just as clear. It is however, unnecessary, since Hugh's sentence was clear and easily understood.

Just to sum up, the rule is a bit draconian, but should still be discussed, if only to better understand one's own language.

28
Reply53 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theUg
theUg
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I think Grammar Girl gives a good explanation (and yes, she used the word “pedantic”). She uses examples of both extraneous prepositions (such as the ubiquitous “Where are you at? — by removing the preposition, the sense remains the same, so it should be left out), and the necessary ones (“What did you step on?” — “What did you step?” makes no sense, and “On what did you step?” is clunky).

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregoryFal3

Winston Churchill would concur.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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There's absolutely nothing wrong with that word order. It's decent and proper, and very correct. I myself am a little ashamed that I didn't think of that before thinking "What level are you in?"

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valencys

I just said "What level are you at" which doesn't feel totally correct but it's how I'd word it in real life and it was accepted.

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

It is changed now. It was counted right for me. JUNE 11

19
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timmyshanti
timmyshanti
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What level are you? Is even better to me.

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

In Spain we would say better ¿En qué nivel estás?

20
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aboyer02
aboyer02
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I'm thinking it just needs to be reported. Your answer still correct, just uncommon in American English now.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX
DarcX
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Happened to me, too.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radek_1985

At which... is accepted though.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elgin56

"At what level are you?" was accepted on 12/18/17

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danny407026

5/18 I just answered, In which level are you? It accepted that

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I just read up on the difference between "what" and "which". "what" is used when there is an unknown number of answers, and "which" is used when there is a limited number of answers.

Seems like it could go either way for "levels", but I'd expect a smallish number of levels where a level is something one can be "in", so "which" seems better to me.

22
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Brilliant, Barbara. I remembered that rule and entered What level are you in? (accepted)

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

"What level are you in?" works, but I personally think "What level are you at?" sounds more natural (Duolingo accepts that as well).

I imagine it's extremely difficult for non-native English speakers to choose the most natural sounding preposition as there doesn't always seem to be any rhyme or reason for which one is used. For example, I would say "What grade are you in?", but "What level are you at?"

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"in", "at", "on" are all fine, with different meanings.

"Which level are you in?" - The school offers classes for 3 levels of Spanish, and I want to know which you are in.

"What level are you at?" - I know you've been studying Spanish for a while, and am curious how you would assess your own level of competence.

"What/which level are you on?" - You are doing an online quiz that gets progressively harder, and I want to know the level you are currently on.

17
Reply34 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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I have never heard a native speaker say "Which level are you IN?" - only AT or ON or simply "What level are you?" I tried to find examples of using IN in dictionaries, but didn't find any. The example you gave doesn't sound convincing: I would use AT in that case. The thing is that a level is like a point or a line; you can't really be in it, only at it or on it.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I'm a Latin teacher. When speaking with my colleagues about the level of a language (Latin II, Spanish III, etc.) we always say, "the students in level III" or "which level was that in?". In this case, level is synonymous with class or course. Since a student can't be "on Latin III this year" or "on my course" we use "in". This isn't just my school, but among colleagues across the US.

5
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Me_llamo_es

What grade are you in? Was accepted and that seems more conversational and common.

3
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Indeed. It's sometimes even hard for native English speakers to choose a preposition. "The second word __ that line". in / of / on ...

I agree about "What level are you at" being more natural. I was so focused on "which vs that" that I didn't pay attention to the rest of the sentence.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Is this just a level of education or can nivel also mean the level in a computer game?

12
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darrhiggs

You can use it the same as you would in english.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManUTDForever

Also you can use it as grade

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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If referring to an educational level, wouldn't "In which grade are you?" Be an acceptable translation instead of level?

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Spanish has "grado" for "grade". But it's unclear to me whether "nivel" could also be used for grade.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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I don't know. Are you familiar enough with the UK or Australian educational system to be certain that a level and a grade are equal to one another? I've lived in Australia for 15 years and I haven't a clue. I know they use the word "year". For example highschool is year 7-10 and then you go to "college" (year 11-12).

Safest to use grado for grade in the US and other places where they use grade, and nivel for level in Australia and the UK etc.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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I tried "What level are you?" and it was not accepted. Can anyone confirm that it is incorrect? I've seen sentences like "I'm level 10 in German" (without any preposition) many times on Duolingo. English is my second language.

4
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"What level are you?" and "I'm level 10" are using "level" as an adjective. It's extremely colloquial to omit the preposition.

I tend towards descriptivism when it comes to saying whether language usage is correct or not, but even though it's fairly common to use "level" (and "grade" for school) this way, I think I'd call it incorrect. I'll be interested to see what others say.

("level" can be an adjective, but it means flat or unchanging.)

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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I agree here. It's fine to say it the colloquial way in every day speech, but when learning a new language, its better to learn it correctly the first time, and then you can become less proper as you become more comfortable with the 'everyday' way that people around you tend to speak. For the purposes of translation, its better to go proper.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeez1960

You say extremely colloquial like its a bad thing. LOL my east coast relatives are always dropping the prepositions. I've learned to love it. "When did he graduate high school" etc.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Ha! I just thought to myself "What's wrong with 'graduate high school'?" I'm not an east coaster ...

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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"from highschool" is what i think he's getting at.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

In the UK they would say "When did he graduate university?" It took me a long time to get used to.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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"level" can also mean "floor", like the floors of a building, which wouldn't be used as an adjective like levels of progression might.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kim233663
kim233663
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"Which floor are you on?" was not accepted even though "floor" is given as a definition for "nivel". Does anyone know under what circumstances floor can be used for nivel if it not in this case?

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kglatt

Level 9 and moving up :)

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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On which level are you? is likewise accepted. I was thinking more in terms of a building or floor.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndresC.
AndresC.
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Both of those two last meanings are correct: an educational program or a computer game. But you would not use "nivel" to refer to the floor of a building. In Latin America, that would be "piso". Keep in mind though: piso in Castillian Spanish means "appartment".

"In which level are you?" is a perfectly good translation as far as grammar goes.

The only reason for anyone to prefer using "qué" instead of "cuál" would be that it is easier and faster to say "qué".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolletAve
NicolletAve
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I wrote "In what grade are you?" and it was marked incorrect. Can anyone tell me what the distinction is, or should I report it next time?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Spanish has "grado" for "grade". But it's unclear to me whether "nivel" could also be used for grade.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

does "grado" mean like the 3rd grade or like a score grade?? Or both??

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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According to spanishdict, "grado" is like the 3rd grade and it looks like "nota" is used for a score grade.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/grade

"The fourth-grade students won the math competition.Los alumnos de cuarto grado ganaron el concurso"

"I got the highest grade on the Spanish exam.Obtuve la nota más alta en el examen de español."

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I can use it to refer to Duolingo if I say "De qué nivel estás en inglés?" or "Cuál es tu nivel en inglés"? Is it correct?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rosalie610178

¿En cual nivel estas o En que nivel estas? Los hablantes nativos de español siempre dicen, EN QUE NIVEL ESTAS.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasmine210458

My sentance was "En cuál nivel estás?" I translated to "Which floor are you on?" and it was marked wrong. They said I need to say "which grade are you on" but that makes no sense and when I clicked on nivel it only gave me 2 word options - level and floor. Someone please explain. Thanks.

1
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

There are a lot of comments in this thread that speak to your question. Some responses, unfortunately, are overly influenced by English language interpretation. Let me try, based upon my reading of the RAE entry:

The word nivel is probably most closely translated to English with "level." To the extent that English speakers (in different parts of the world) use "level" to refer to various things related to some category or scale of measurement, it is okay to translate nivel that way. I would not, however, translate nivel to anything but "level" or some very close synonym.

For example, I don't think I've ever used "level" to refer to a grade in school. Thus, I would never use nivel in that context when speaking Spanish. Similarly, I do use "level" to talk about levels of a building - the parking level, the street level, etc. I might, therefore, use nivel in a similar fashion when describing a building level in Spanish. On the other hand, I do not use "level" to talk about "floors" of a building. In my mind, the 4th floor is never the 4th level. I would not use nivel in that context.

As an aside, not directed at you, translating nivel from Spanish to English, it doesn't make a lot of sense to replace the word "level" with "grade," "floor," or any other word that "level" might overlap with (again, only in the sense of a category or measurement scale) If you interpret the Spanish sentence as referring to the idea of a "grade" level and you like to use "level" in that sense, then just use the word "level." Put another way, it is wrong to recognize nivel as meaning "level" and then go to a thesaurus and find words related to "level" as if they should all work in a translation. Just use "level" and move on.

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingots4Luck

OVER 9000!!!!!!

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

I would say "which level are you on" not "in". If you were talking about a class then that would be acceptable

1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Careerkid

I woud say which level are you on? You can substitute the word studying for on by asking What are you studying instead

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnwallaceone

If i can get a little more basic, I answered which level is this and i don't understand why that is wrong. Can someone explain it to me?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

In cual nivel estás. En :in Cual :which Nivel:level Estás: are you. Estás here is verb Estar in 2nd person.
So there is no translation except this. You can only chsnge some word order... so there is no THIS IS in the sentence

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k-kayak

DL accepted "At what level are you?"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roman192
roman192
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It sounds like "¿En cuál nivel estarás?"

0
Reply2 years ago