"DeireadhFómhairgoSamhain."

Translation:October to November.

4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The audio has been replaced. Comment no longer valid.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I was looking at the sentence and listening to the audio trying to figure out what the hell you were talking about until I realised this was a comment about the old audio.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Can someone tell which months are feminine and which are masculine?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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  • feminine: Feabhra, Bealtaine, Samhain, Mí na Nollag.
  • masculine: Éanair, Márta, Aibreán, Meitheamh, Iúil, Lúnasa, Meán Fómhair, Deireadh Fómhair.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grf1426
grf1426
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OR :- All with a fada are Masc., except Meitheamh, which is M All Without a fada are Fem., except Meitheamh, which is M

to make it easier to remember. (ignoring the fada on Mí in mí na nollag)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigGuy4UUUU

GRMA

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Is the festival of Samhain celebrated in Ireland nowadays ? In the USA (at least in Illinois) it is celebrated by some Celtic Pagans. I think its beautiful and great to celebrate equinoxes and change of seasons like that. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Oíche Shamhna is celebrated with bonfires and fireworks and young children in costumes going from door to door.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Yes it would be much better and make more sense than religious nonsense !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

Am I correct in saying that the mh in both fómhair and samhain is broad? Cause she pronounces it as a v in fómhair and as a w in samhain. Which confuses me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

She didn't learn to speak Irish by reading the pronunciation rules in a book, and in her part of the country, the Irish name for October is pronounced with a "v" sound. Elsewhere, it's usually pronounced with a "w" sound.

(It's not even a Connacht thing - many people from Connacht use a "w" sound in this case, though they would also pronounce snámh or lámh with a "v" sound).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

ok cool, thanks. i was just wanting to make sure i wasn't misunderstanding the pronunciation rules.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You're better off thinking of them as guidelines than rules. While Irish spelling is far more regular than English when it comes to pronunciation, there are regional pronunciation variations, sometimes generalized (affecting most occurrences of a particular letter/combination) and sometimes specific - just a different way of pronouncing a particular word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

This new voice is much better sounding than the last one. Any idea which dialect she's speaking? My uncle used to say Jer Fowr go Sahwin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Ok, so does it need both words for October or would someone understand if you just used the first word since the clues tell me both of them mean October..just wondering.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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The clues tell you that Deireadh Fómhair together means October, but that deireadh by itself means "end". You need both words because Deireadh Fómhair literally translates as "end of autumn/harvest".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaoiseMcHale

Is it not Mí na Samhna?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky528429
ricky528429
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Can someone explain why sometimes it wants u to use mí na and sometimes not?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Stephen
Sr.Stephen
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Am I hearing "Tha-win" for "Samhain"? I'm just not sure about the initial sound.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

"Tha-win" (very inaccurate transcription based on English) would be for <Shamhain>

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ephraimwaters
ephraimwaters
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Does anybody really care about proper linguistic transcription here? Maybe I'm just an old country bumpkin about language acquisition, but it's Irish I'm interested in. And by the way, aren't there several dialectical variations in the pronunciation of Irish. In light of this I am confused about all the complaints about pronunciation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Well, the reason I generally avoid it is because most people don't know the IPA. So I just tend to use English transcriptions. Also, generally, people don't finish the course. And, if they do, it's not likely that they keep going with

Edit: The original speaker used a 'Learner's dialect'. Now they have a native. Please disregard any old comments about the audio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesusCouto
JesusCouto
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People who know IPA would be so grateful to you if some difficult pronuntiations were transcribed to it. You would make our lives easier ;-) Thank you for all your help! I am learning a lot with you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamh3

On the other hand if the language is to expand then expect more non-native accents.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ephraimwaters
ephraimwaters
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I have heard eoir pronounced like izh. Is this proper Irish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Really.English sounds to Irish words?.Doesn't seem like that to me.I have never heard a back of the throat pronunciation of English words.Some words seem to be total left out in the pronunciation like the go in the above sentence.Memory rather than logic is the only way I have a chance of identify pronunciations with the written word

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

This comment was made over a year ago, which means it was before the current speaker. Please disregard it as it isn't true with the native speaker they have now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

I didnt hear the go at all !!! but guessed the rest!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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All I do is push skip. I can't remember any of these all jumbled up like this.

2 years ago
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