"DeireadhFómhairgoSamhain."

Translation:October to November.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The audio has been replaced. Comment no longer valid.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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I was looking at the sentence and listening to the audio trying to figure out what the hell you were talking about until I realised this was a comment about the old audio.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Can someone tell which months are feminine and which are masculine?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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  • feminine: Feabhra, Bealtaine, Samhain, Mí na Nollag.
  • masculine: Éanair, Márta, Aibreán, Meitheamh, Iúil, Lúnasa, Meán Fómhair, Deireadh Fómhair.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grf1426
grf1426
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OR :- All with a fada are Masc., except Meitheamh, which is M All Without a fada are Fem., except Meitheamh, which is M

to make it easier to remember. (ignoring the fada on Mí in mí na nollag)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigGuy4UUUU

GRMA

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Is the festival of Samhain celebrated in Ireland nowadays ? In the USA (at least in Illinois) it is celebrated by some Celtic Pagans. I think its beautiful and great to celebrate equinoxes and change of seasons like that. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Oíche Shamhna is celebrated with bonfires and fireworks and young children in costumes going from door to door.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

Am I correct in saying that the mh in both fómhair and samhain is broad? Cause she pronounces it as a v in fómhair and as a w in samhain. Which confuses me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

She didn't learn to speak Irish by reading the pronunciation rules in a book, and in her part of the country, the Irish name for October is pronounced with a "v" sound. Elsewhere, it's usually pronounced with a "w" sound.

(It's not even a Connacht thing - many people from Connacht use a "w" sound in this case, though they would also pronounce snámh or lámh with a "v" sound).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

ok cool, thanks. i was just wanting to make sure i wasn't misunderstanding the pronunciation rules.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You're better off thinking of them as guidelines than rules. While Irish spelling is far more regular than English when it comes to pronunciation, there are regional pronunciation variations, sometimes generalized (affecting most occurrences of a particular letter/combination) and sometimes specific - just a different way of pronouncing a particular word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

This new voice is much better sounding than the last one. Any idea which dialect she's speaking? My uncle used to say Jer Fowr go Sahwin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricky528429
ricky528429
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Can someone explain why sometimes it wants u to use mí na and sometimes not?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Ok, so does it need both words for October or would someone understand if you just used the first word since the clues tell me both of them mean October..just wondering.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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The clues tell you that Deireadh Fómhair together means October, but that deireadh by itself means "end". You need both words because Deireadh Fómhair literally translates as "end of autumn/harvest".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaoiseMcHale

Is it not Mí na Samhna?

4 months ago
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