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"Usted iba a París."

Translation:You used to go to Paris.

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Hola amigos.. as ever context can be helpful and help to define sentences but I feel its best to go with the flow and get the general sense of things and remember that there are often several ways to express the same thing in our own languages. Different possible meanings for this sentence could be for example:

You used to go to Paris ( every month on business)- habitual past.

You would go to Paris (every month on business)- habitual past.

You went to Paris ( every month on business)- habitual past.

All convey the same thing and in Spanish you would use the imperfect.

You were going to Paris ( when the train broke down).

The first part of the sentence is providing background information or description so again you would use the Imperfect for this and the probably change to the past simple/preterite for the definite event of the train breaking down.

General descriptions, background information, habits in the past = Imperfecto

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffindance
griffindance
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You would go to Paris...?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I think the "would" makes it conditional, iri'a

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shawy89

Actually, I think his answer could work. Although perhaps it would need some more context... for example:

"When you were younger, you would go to Paris every summer".

This is therefore the imperfect tense, because it's an ongoing action in the past.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_smiles_

Yeah, the modal verb 'would,' in addition to expressing conditional things, can also be used to express the habitual past.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobspaj

English is pretty much hopeless in terms of distinguishing between imperfect and past perfect tenses without some context. I put 'I went to Paris' which was marked as correct. If I meant a habitual action, I probably would have specified how often and when I went. 'I went to Paris often in the last few years' The English verb forms simply lack precision.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EraldoCarv
EraldoCarv
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You would go to Paris if you had enough money to spend there. Wouldn't you? When I was young, I used to go there very often.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miajav
miajav
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You were going to Paris? Is that a correct translation too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielBolt1

You went to Paris is okay but not you would go to Paris... You went is the preterite! Would go is past habitual action, the imperfect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MargretheAnton

'You went to Paris' got accepted as an answer. I get confused by this when the suggested translation is 'You used to go to Paris'. Are both correct? Is there a difference between the two? If so, when is what used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntoPieiro
AntoPieiro
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In Spanish there are two types of past: a "perfective" (complete) past (you did the action, probably just once, and the action is completely done) and an "imperfective" (incomplete) past (you did the action once and may or may not keep doing it in the past); this is the case of "iba". In terms of meaning, "you used to go to Paris" is more apropiated because it gives a sence that you did the action once but you kept doing it in the past; you went to Paris once and may have come back in another moment of the past. "You went to Paris" has a more perfective meaning, as if you went to Paris once, and either you stood there or never went back to Paris again. In that case, "usted FUE a Paris" could be a more exact translation of "were" because its meaning is perfective.

Both "went" and "used to go" could be taken as correct, but I would choose "used to go" in this case because of the imperfective meaning of the "iba". I don't know when you wrote this but I hope my explanation helps you! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiriathaim

Great explanation and insight! This helps me with my understanding of this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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a lingot for you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tuck404
Tuck404
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Great explanation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Timee4
Timee4
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How would this be represented if it was preterite?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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Usted fue a Paris.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

You went to Paris was accepted which to me would indicate a different sense of meaning than the above.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevinLukac

Él iba a Jared!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sara.f.wolf

In Spanish does this sentence imply that you don't go there anymore, like the given translation in English does? "You used to go to Paris."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
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No, in Spanish you have not stopped to go there, on the contrary. In my opininon used to is a bad translation for Spanish imperative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Hello, Kirakraka and Sara,

Firstly, you can't use "stopped to go" as in your reply above you have to say stopped going. Secondly I think people are also getting a bit confused with used to which doesn't automatically imply not any more or never again. Don't forget that as stand alone sentences without context they can sometimes be ambiguous or there are several ways to say the same thing as in this instance.

I used to go to Paris - every month last year I went to Paris-every month last year I would go to Paris- every month last year

All mean the same in English and none of them mean you won't go again, they simply mean that it was a habitual action in the past

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
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None of us recommended stopped to go. We were fretting about the translation you used to go recommended by Duo since i gives the impression that the person does not go there anymore. And this is wrong because the Spanish imperfect is used for actions with an indefinite ending. I prefer You went to Paris for Duo. (Maybe even you often go or you use to go)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Hi there, sorry I think maybe you misunderstood my post. In your reply to a question from Sara you say "....you have not stopped to go there" ...(see above)

So I was just pointing out ( in a friendly way) that the English Grammar was incorrect not whether it was the best "translation" or use for the particular sentence. You have also made another mistake with your reply when you say "I often go, or I use go". I often go would be a present tense, you could use I often went ( as correct English but not as an answer to this question, and Use to is just incorrect it should be Used to.

I then addressed the overall theme of the topic and the "best translation" and fully agree with you that the sentences do not mean the person no longer goes as per my comments.

Good luck

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra
kirakrakra
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Thank you for the corrections. The main point for me is "I used to do something" can this really mean that I still do it? If not it cannot be used for Spanish Imperfect. In my language Swedish one must use present tense for a habit which still is valid.

2 years ago