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  5. "Tá moncaí agat."

" moncaí agat."

Translation:You have a monkey.

November 9, 2014

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BreannaKee

What would it be for monkeys?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liamog
  • Tá moncaithe agat

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luvlivre

Why is everyone deleting their comments??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ender1952

Is the English word for monkey from Celtic then? I've always wondered why it's so different from the Latin and Germanic words for them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael63849

Does a parallel pronunciation rule exist in English that I can, generally, transfer to Irish? Specifically, I have inferred, perhaps erroneously, that broad vowels often translate to a "hard" consonant, e.g. church, car. Slender vowels, conversely, effect or require a "soft" consonant, e.g. cinnamon, cellar.
Perhaps I have not completed enough of the course to have learned whether one exists, but I hoped someone could provide insight. To the extent possible, I have emphasized pronunciation as I learn vocabulary and grammar.


[deactivated user]

    c in Irish is what you call a "hard" consonant. carr, ceo, cinnte, conas and cupán are all pronounced with a "k" sound, and ch in Irish is a lenition of the "hard" consonant". I'm not sure why you think that the English "ch" is a "hard consonant" - it is used with both broad and slender vowels ("chap", "cherry", "chip", "chop", church" all have the same "ch" sound), and the English "ch" is clearly a modification of what you call a "soft c" - a totally different sound from the Irish ch, produced in a completely different location in the mouth.

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