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  5. "Ritheann mo mháthair chomh m…

"Ritheann mo mháthair chomh minic agus is féidir."

Translation:My mother runs as often as possible.

November 10, 2014

19 Comments


[deactivated user]

    I'm really confused about what happened to "agus" in this sentence. I don't remember being taught that it can translate to anything but "and".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

    It's just how it's formed with things with comh in some situations (cé chomh airde is atá tú)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1010201018

    Would it not be good if it was explained, as a new "phrase" so that we knew that "chomh ... agus" means " as... as"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

    I agree it'd be better if it was explained in the tips and notes. Also, you can't use chomh ... agus every time - like with adjectives. Instead you'd use chomh ... le - chomh glioc le sinnoach, for example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrikis1

    There's no tips and notes for adjectives? I didn't see any anyway


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    The dictionary entry for agus shows several instances where it doesn’t translate as “and”. [See definition 4. (g) there for this particular case.]


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

    Your answers are always so helpful. Here, have a lingot.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
    • 1831

    Could agus be shortened to is in this context as well as when it means and?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Yes, but chomh … is is féidir might not be as clear as chomh … agus is féidir.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

    oh, for goodness sake. My answer was clearly acceptable 'my mother runs as often as she can.' Not literal I know, I know. But very frustrating.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1451

    "as often as she can" is chomh minic agus is féidir léi.

    The presence or otherwise of the preposition makes a difference in the most appropriate translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p8c
    • 214

    but semantically equivalent for sure. i would report it and ask that your answer be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceruttis

    I agree, that's the same answer I gave also and should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stmonkeydoom

    It seems to be accepting it now


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

    I'm confused by the grammatical purpose of féidir. Teanglann.ie says it's a substantive in Irish, yet translates it as 'possible'. And that's an adjective in English (I checked an English dictionary to make sure). There's something different going on in the Irish construction... I feel it has something to do with the copula... Maybe suggesting that of all possibilities (substantive), this is the one that occurs?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1451

    No, you're confused by your attempts to make Irish grammar fit into an English shaped-box. "maybe" (b'fhéidir) and "can" (Is féidir le) aren't adjectives.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LornaHall1

    ...as often as she can, is also correct, isnt it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1451

    Not quite. "as often as she can" is chomh minic agus is féidir léi.

    is féidir liom - "I can"
    is féidir leat - "You can"
    is féidir leis - "he can"
    is féidir léi - "she can"

    The difference is more pronounced in English when you add or remove a pronoun:
    chomh minic agus is féidir liom - "as often as I can"
    chomh minic agus is féidir - "as often as (is) possible"

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