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"They are going to be able to eat."

Translation:Ellas van a lograr comer.

5 years ago

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Is "Ellas podrán comer." really a correct translation? No "van a" ? Is this a mistake?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babydoc17

I was also wondering about this. Upon looking up the entire conjugation of poder, it seems that podrán is a future tense (which i havent learned yet). So podrán could mean 'going to be able' I guess. Not really fair but it's computer generated so it doesn't know 'fair'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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The DL translation is not really a good one. It should be "Ellos van a poder comer." "Ellos podrán comer" is closer in English to "They will be able to eat." DL should fix this issue.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoctorArbol

It's completely fair. They do this on purpose to initiate familiarity with the future tense, which of course functions like ir future. You don't need to know it yet, but if they throw a couple at you, your mind will have an easier time making the connection.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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Yes, "podrán" is future tense, which you'll learn further in the tree.

"Ellas podrán comer" corresponds more directly to saying "They will be able to eat." whereas "van a lograr comer" is more like "going to be able to eat", but the phrases are almost completely interchangeable in English, with only subtle differences in connotation, so I think it's okay to translate each phrase both ways.

I'm a native English speaker, not Spanish...so I don't fully understand the differences in connotation, but I tend to hear the "va a" construction more often than I hear the future tense, in the Spanish I tend to hear in my daily life.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SWilliamsJ
SWilliamsJ
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If we're going to learn it later, perhaps Duolingo should have waited until later to include it in an exercise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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I understand this perspective, and I used to be annoyed by the way DuoLingo tests us on things before introducing them to us, but over time I've actually come to like this, because it corresponds more to the way native speakers naturally learn their native language in an immersive setting.

I think stuff like this is one of the reasons DuoLingo is so effective, and if you can learn to move from annoyance and start to appreciate and work with it, at least I've found for myself, it helps me to learn much more effectively.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnkitGarg.Pec

I liked your way of explaining this. I think the same way about Duolingo's way of teaching. Perhaps, Duolingo should put this on their website as a quick explanation to their way (of teaching).

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrrha01
Myrrha01
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I think that "ellos van a lograr comer" could be most accurately translated as "they will manage to eat".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I don't mean to be a jerk (or worse), but there really is no "learn it later." It's not a class with a linear sequence of exercises that build to a climax of total understanding. Sure, there are different sections that tend to focus on one element or another. But that's merely an organizational tool and a way to keep learners from being overwhelmed by too many new concepts at once.

Honestly, how much damage is done by mixing up future tense with phrasal future? Conceptually, they belong together. Doesn't that make you wonder if and how they're different, when to use one versus the other, etc.? (Spoiler alert! They're semantically identical. The only difference is in how they're constructed.) So, why not get some exposure to these two different forms right now and start to recognize them rather than get hung up on keeping them compartmentalized?

The same attitude generalizes to all of the levels in the tree. The further you progress, the more arbitrary these boundaries will seem when it comes to learning the language. You need them initially to recognize the patterns, but that should only take a few repetitions. There is far more depth to be gained from forgetting what should be in what box and trying to understand exactly why each sentence is written the way it's written.

EDIT: Earlier I wrote, "They're semantically identical [meaning phrasal future and future tense]. The only difference is in how they're constructed." I have to take that back - thanks to a post elsewhere from rogercchristie. While there is certainly some overlap in the usage of the phrasal future and the future tense, they are not 100% interchangeable.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephendufton

Hear , hear .... I know its computer generated , but a lot of this happens . It's not fair and it's discouraging

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

here is some tissue

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamia91

No, "ellas podrán comer" is more natural in Spanish than the other way

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Is it a different tense?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pashatv
pashatv
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It is Future. I believe it's somewhere down the tree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginthesea

I interpreted podrán as "they will be able to" versus "they are going to be able to." Ah well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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FYI, I used "poder" instead of "lograr" and it was accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sir_Carl
Sir_Carl
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Me too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MullenJeremiah

Doesn't poder express some kind of physical capability , whereas lograr expresses some kind of achievement ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

Yes, but "lograr a comer" still means "will be able to eat."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Why don't you need a second "a" before comer here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Comer is an infinitive. It means "to eat" in this context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Well so is lograr and "a" is needed before it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

That is because "ir + a + infinitive" is how ones expresses the idea of "going to do something"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanSchre1

Thanks for making this rule clear!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jstarr37

i dont know about you but this section is HARD ive come back to it two or three times already. it should be EASY but its not

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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It's hard, but it would be harder if there were more English-to-Spanish translations instead of Spanish-to-English. I'm figuring a lot of these out by intuition and context and I feel like I'm not learning the proper sentence construction and grammar as much as I would if I had to translate into Spanish more. Same with the infinitive section. I'm also using spanishdict.com as a crutch. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

I`ve thought this, too. I would like to see more English-to-Spanish translations in ALL of the lessons. Yes, it would be harder but I think more productive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

I totally agree, Rob2042. We need many more English to Spanish translations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I think most would agree as they progress further along. As you and others have learned, you simply switch to the reverse learning path (i.e., Spanish -> English).

For those who have no idea what I'm talking about and would like to get more English -> Spanish practice, you can change your native language to Spanish in the settings and then load the English language lesson. You'll need to read the instructions etc. in Spanish, but it's a great way to gain additional exposure.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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I'm finding that too. In theory this should be simple - ir + a+ inf is pretty straightforward - but in practice I've made more mistakes in this section than anything else we've covered so far. I don't quite know why.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyBursuk

What's wrong with "capaz?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrisBoc

Nothing. I just put "Ellos van a ser capaces de comer" and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jafink
jafink
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"Van a estar hábil de comer" was also accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiriathaim

Not for me! Lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/averrryyyyyy

I thought you have to include an "a" if you are putting two verbs together. So I wrote, "Ellas van a lograr a comer." to be able (lograr) + a + to eat (comer) ? Any help with when the a is there or not. ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"Ellos van a poder comer" was accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eileen635107
Eileen635107
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They didn't accept that for me.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tehranchi27

I saw many mistakes, it takes long time to correct these mistakes even you send so many reports to let them know about problems .

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KinanHabbal
KinanHabbal
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Ellos van a ser capaces de comer was also accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LALaw_duo

They "will" eat and they will "be able to" eat are not the same. Podrán should not be accepted in my opinion

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoMonster
DuoMonster
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Shouldnt there be a "de" between the two infinitives?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I have a question as well about the omission of "a' before comer. Logically it seems like its needed however 'to be able' and 'to eat'. We have usually used 'a' before comer when its been "ellas van a comer" I am thinking that perhaps the first infinitive needs the 'a' but it's understood/implied for the second infinitive. We've had other multiple infinitives but I can't recall if they were treated the same i.e. One. 'a' only???

Or as rpreng says it really applies only because of the use of 'ir'. 'to eat' is what we are going to do, right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

You need the 'a' before the verb that is going to happen in the future. In this case, they are going "to be able", not going "to eat" which would be what you mentioned "ellas van a comer".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpoll

"They will achieve eating" does not seem like the statement that was asked for.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zacrilege

Why is Ellos van a capaz comer not accepted? I know google translate is crude, but "ellos van a capaz comer" and "ellos van a poder comer" come back in english identical.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benmaja
benmaja
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capaz comer - I think this was not accepted because capaz is an adjective describing someone as capable, so you would need to say capable of, or capaz de. All the rest of this exercise is about verbs before infinitives, not adjectives. The poder does not need an "a" after it because poder means "to be able to" so it already has the "a" included in its meaning, - it's like the English "can eat" versus "be capable of eating"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autopsyblue

I don't understand why this is in the "ir a unconjugated form" section

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ron330592

Nothing is right with all selections

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pawan_chand
pawan_chand
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Is “ellos van a ser capaz a comer“ correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmadouOuim1

Ellos van a poder comer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmadouOuim1

Ellos van a podràn comer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tehranchi27

System error. Does not accept any answer????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/albox01

Podran is will be able. Van a poder is going to be able

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clarence940074

All answers are coming up wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew864378
Matthew864378
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So why was I marked wrong for not also saying "van a lograr comer"? Going to achieve eating is not the same as going to be able to eat.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hg3UVt
hg3UVt
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I read the below comment about podran being future tense, but future tense of what? "Going to be able to" and future "can" have very little in common and it is disconcerting when the computer generates an obscure translation that wouldn't pass muster in a discussion. Having said that, it's still a pretty great way to learn a lengue!!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I think I understand your question. Look at it this way, which is perhaps odd, but still...

"going to ..." is a phrasal future form, right? We can translate "going to run" as "will run" in that sense. If you had "van a poder," you'd translate that as "going to be able to." But it's also "will be able to" using the same logic of interpreting phrasal future as future. That's how you get to "podrán." It seems as if there's an extra "going to" in there, but it's just a manner of speaking.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogunzjoel

A bit confusing. Isnt 'lograr' to achieve?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tatevanpat

Why is it lograr and not poder?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayaGannon

Why does this question accept only 'ellas podrán' and not 'ustedes podrán?'

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LejaPiko

Why is 'Ellos' wrong?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

If the translation on the previous sentence was " ellas van a lograr comer" why isn't this option in the multiple choice here??

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric934080
Eric934080
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I thought that Ellas and Ellos both meant "They".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

You're right, they do.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie695514

i uses lograr not poder so why was i wrong please?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_MsLexi_
_MsLexi_
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Wait you can have two infinitive next to each other?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Yes. This happens with a number of verbs.

While there are no hard and fast rules regarding the use of intervening prepositions with verb combinations, modal verbs such as poder, lograr, deber, intentar, etc. are generally followed by infinitives with no intervening preposition.

Bear in mind that the issue is not whether two infinitives are joined by a preposition or not. Rather, it's how any two verbs are combined. In the sentence, Van a poder comer, there are actually three linked verbs: ir + poder + comer. While ir requires the preposition "a", poder does not. You have seen the latter in "able-to-do-something" constructions where the verb poder is conjugated and the "doing something" verb is not; e.g., puedo andar = "I can go/walk."

It's not because poder is conjugated that you have no intervening preposition. It's because it's a modal verb. Another common "helper" verb is tener, which is followed by que and then the infinitive; e.g., tengo que andar = "I have to go/walk." And, finally, sometimes each verb is separated by a preposition: voy a tener que andar = "I'll have to go/walk." Hopefully, you get the idea.

Here's a good web site that gives a lot of information regarding when to use and not to use prepositions between verbs.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maribee3
Maribee3
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Nosotros 7 no p [my u

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/srw3
srw3
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someone explain to me how seran means going to. Apparently to post before me it was podran???????

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Well, it doesn't. Not really.

The verb serán (with accent) is the 3rd person plural future tense of ser - "to be." Thus, serán means "they will be" or (usually) equivalently "they are going to be."

The verb poder is "to be able to." And podrán is its 3rd person plural future tense. It means "they will be able to" or (usually) equivalently, "they are going to be able to."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rembob

"Ellos van a poder de comer". Is there a reason this interpretation is incorrect? If so please explain.

.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

I have read all the comments and I am still a bit in the dark on understanding how we can have two infinitives in a row. I get the future tense of: ir + a + infinitive. But this sentence is: ir + a + infinitive + infinitive. Yikes!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

All of the comments put together should give you an answer, but I have one more thing to add. Since any Spanish infinitive can be translated two ways–as the "to" + stem verb form or as the "ing" form–a phrase like "van a lograr comer" can be translated as "are going to be able to eat" or as "will be eating." So far, I've been able to swap out the verbals to use the "ing" (gerund/participial) form when it suits or the "to" + stem verb (infinitive) form when it suits. I've also noticed that sometimes a preposition like "de" is used before an infinitive to make an adjectival prepositional phrase, such as "el agua de beber" (drinking water). Hope this helps. ;^)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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it's exactly the same composition as the English version. "they are going" = regular conjugation of "to go", "to be able" = infinitive, "to eat" = infinitive.
"Van" = regular conjugation of "ir", Lograr = to be able, comer = to eat. The only difference is that Spanish throws an extra "a" in between the ir and the first infinitive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mohamed_kammal

" Ellos van a lograr a comer " is not the answer !! Thanks feminists !

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macie94

Why "capaces de"?

4 years ago