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  5. "Como vai a sua mulher?"

"Como vai a sua mulher?"

Translation:How is your wife doing?

June 29, 2013

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikLeiden

Why isn't it also acceptable to say "your woman" instead of "your wife"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

This reminded me of an old English idiom/euphamism: "How's your father"

It's old now...I think it was popular 1940's to 1970's...so Grandparents would understand it... "A bit of how's your father" = "sexy time!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimmySosa

Being from england i know of that idiom lol, although i am no grandparent. Far from it in fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brucethebogking

"How's it going?" (Abbreviated to "howzit?" in South Africa) is a fairly common expression I think. Hence "How is it going with your wife?" should be included as an alternative translation maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/triwoo78

I agree. I answered, "How goes your wife?" and it marked it as incorrect. But in the U.S., we often say, "How goes it?" or "How's it going?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amelie605249

We do say, "how's it going?", but I ve never heard anyone use that with any noun but "it" where that means life in general or a particular task. "How goes your wife" doesn't really make any sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annie145876

Same. I said "How is your wife going" (I'm Aussie).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peterjoel58

I lived the 1st half my live in US and the 2nd in Aus, so I also said "how is your wife going", but felt that it should have had "mate" on the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharnayFer

Howzit is a slang word for "how is it" basically we use it to say hello.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nesoki

In other lessons "a sua" sometimes meant "your" or "his/her", why is in this case the only correct solution "your"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickPotter16

A sua/O seu will mean your always that the pronoun he or she doesn't exist. Seu/Sua only mean his/her when either the pronoun he/ele or she/ela has appeared before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

Thanks Rick, that's great, I hadn't realized that before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

I had asked before; What If this was a newspaper headline: "Perdem o seu dinheiro!" Whose money have they lost?

Now I understand that it would mean: "They lose your money" If the headline = "They lose her money"....I guess it would have to be: "Perdem o deneiro della!" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

"Perdem o dinheiro dela", sim, exatamente xDDD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bexroxsox

Im confused about this sentance, wouldnt it be como e a sua mulher?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleversong

Como está sua mulher or Como vai a sua mulher.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

wait 'till you come across "della/delle"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferretchere

"How is your wife going" should be accepted too but is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurtzim

How would you say: "how do you go to your wife"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sr_Romantico

You have to be very careful in how you say this in English or it could be interpreted incorrectly. BTW, most Brazilians I know use esposa not sua mulher.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/legarzon

I took woman instead wife , before decide which one to shosse between the two correct answers and then marked me a mistake , why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borboleta0328

I also feel the same. I need to know why wife and not woman. I thought wife was espousa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamOwenI

Someone explained by saying that mulher means woman unless accompanied with a possessive. People don't really own women anyway...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

...and even rental is frowned upon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTKee-EnglishEng

How's your missus is the correct English translation I think you'll find.

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