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  5. "Táim ag fágáil le dul go dtí…

"Táim ag fágáil le dul go dtí an siopa."

Translation:I am leaving to go to the shop.

November 11, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hopswatch

Does 'le' in this sentence mean something like "in order to"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackmchugh12

could you expand it more. For what type of sentences can 'le' meaning i n order too :) thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

When using a verbal noun, if it has le before it, it expresses purpose, intention, duty, necessity, possibility, or guarantee. (It also means you can get forms like le mé a shábháil). This is often passive, and an agent can be added with ag (Tá obair le déanamh agam (There is work to be done by me - I have work to do)).

Sources


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

So a bit like archaic English "I am leaving for to go to the shop"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1489

Yes, "for to" is a bit like an archaic English version of "in order to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

Isn't this a use for imeacht rather than fágáil?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grettir666

It may be current in the Gaeltacht, but surely it's bearlachas? (leave is used in all these different senses in english, so let's use it in irish for the same senses).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No, it’s not an anglicism at all. This meaning has been in Irish since Old Irish, with intransitive use since Middle Irish: see the eDIL entries for fo-ácaib (the ancestor of fág) and fácbáil (the ancestor of fágáil ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grettir666

I stand corrected! Thanks, and thanks for introducing me to the eDIL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colmdodd

I won't repeat what others have said but fágáil is often used when leaving something/ someone behind. "Imeacht" would be used when departing. But normally we would just say "Táim ag dul go..."or at a stretch I might say "Táim ag dul amach go dtí..." : I am going out to go ..>"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John365571

imeacht is a more normal form of "leaving" in any version of Irish I have heard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanleyMcG

should be 'ag imeacht'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

Could 'chun' be used in place of 'le' ? If so, would the word order be different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1489

Yes, you can use chun in this sentence.

Táim ag fágáil chun dul go dtí an siopa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

Go raibh míle maith agat a chara!

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