"Táim ag fágáil le dul go dtí an siopa."

Translation:I am leaving to go to the shop.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hopswatch
Hopswatch
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Does 'le' in this sentence mean something like "in order to"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Indeed it does!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

could you expand it more. For what type of sentences can 'le' meaning i n order too :) thanks in advance!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

When using a verbal noun, if it has le before it, it expresses purpose, intention, duty, necessity, possibility, or guarantee. (It also means you can get forms like le mé a shábháil). This is often passive, and an agent can be added with ag (Tá obair le déanamh agam (There is work to be done by me - I have work to do)).

Sources

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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Isn't this a use for imeacht rather than fágáil?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grettir666
grettir666
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It may be current in the Gaeltacht, but surely it's bearlachas? (leave is used in all these different senses in english, so let's use it in irish for the same senses).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No, it’s not an anglicism at all. This meaning has been in Irish since Old Irish, with intransitive use since Middle Irish: see the eDIL entries for fo-ácaib (the ancestor of fág) and fácbáil (the ancestor of fágáil ).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grettir666
grettir666
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I stand corrected! Thanks, and thanks for introducing me to the eDIL

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/colmdodd
colmdodd
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I won't repeat what others have said but fágáil is often used when leaving something/ someone behind. "Imeacht" would be used when departing. But normally we would just say "Táim ag dul go..."or at a stretch I might say "Táim ag dul amach go dtí..." : I am going out to go ..>"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

imeacht is a more normal form of "leaving" in any version of Irish I have heard

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanleyMcG

should be 'ag imeacht'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittDunne
KittDunne
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Could 'chun' be used in place of 'le' ? If so, would the word order be different?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Yes, you can use chun in this sentence.

Táim ag fágáil chun dul go dtí an siopa

9 months ago
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