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  5. "Ní léann sé riamh."

" léann riamh."

Translation:He never reads.

November 11, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

I've submitted a report, so that might resolve my question, but could this be translated as "He doesn't ever read."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mavedave

'She doesn't read ever' is how i translated it. Hiberno-english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jake746269

I should know this, but how is "leann" pronounced? More like "Lay-an" really quickly, or "yay-an".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1445

"l" is never silent in Irish - the l in léann is pronounced.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sualainnis

What does "Tá léann sé riamh" mean? Seems like there are double negatives; "He does never not read"...

edit: I guess with "Ní riamh" means "never" and just "riamh" means "ever"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatHargan

'Tá léann sé riamh' doesn't mean anything - you have two verbs, 'tá' and 'léann'. The (grammatical) opposite of 'ní léann sé riamh' would be 'léann sé riamh'.

'Riamh' can mean ever or never, depending on context. http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fgb/riamh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arrikis1

What is léann sé riamh supposed to mean? It translates to he ever reads but the opposite of he never reads is he always reads. Is léann sé riamh really how you say he always reads?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

So Léann sé riamh means something like "He's always reading" or "He's (for)ever reading"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1445

No, you wouldn't say léann sé riamh

Bíonn sé i gcónaí ag léamh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

So léann sé riamh isn't the opposite of ní léann sé riamh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1445

No. If you take the "not" out of "he doesn't ever read" you don't get the opposite in English either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

OK. I was just commenting on PatHargan's post about 6 posts above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

Well, you haven't gotten back to me yet, so I'll add a couple of questions.

Does léann sé riamh mean anything? If so, what?

What does PatHargan mean above by, "The (grammatical) opposite of 'ní léann sé riamh' would be 'léann sé riamh'."? In your opinion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1445

you wouldn't say léann sé riamh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

I'm pretty sure your edit is correct: ní ... riamh is "not ever", and riamh alone is "ever."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/damien67

You are allowed "double negatives" in Irish, I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RemcoVonk

I think it is more like in french: 'Il ne lit jamais' (He never reads). Where the combination of 'ne...jamais' means 'never'.

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