Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Estoy seguro de que tienes mucho más para dar."

Translation:I am sure that you have much more to give.

0
5 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/darrylogan

Why is the 'de' needed here?

28
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saballama

See below in rmcgwn's response to Daniel-in-BC's similar question.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smallquanni
smallquanni
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I guess "de" works like a prep "about" here but it seems duolingo denies me.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sburgess92

I wondered about this as well

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Does anyone know why de and que are both needed in this sentence?

18
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Daniel-in-BC you've asked a tough question. I went in search of an answer and found this.

Que translates "that" as a relative pronoun, while de que translates "that" as a conjunction. Although que can be used as a subordinate or subordinating conjunction when it follows a verb, de que normally is used as a subordinating conjunction following a noun.

So how can you tell if you're translating a sentence of this pattern to Spanish if "that" should be translated as que or de que? Almost always, if you can change "that" to "which" and the sentence still makes sense, "that" is being used as a relative pronoun and you should use que. Otherwise, use de que. 

If you look again at our sentence you will see that it is definitely a conjunction and you can't use which so rule is use de que. Hope that helps.

93
Reply155 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

I found another strategy for it, for example: "antes" by itself means before but when using it in a sentence of comparison you need to "put it in action" by using "antes de".

So, in the case of seguro de, seguro by itself is (sure) but when used "in action" you would use "seguro de" then que for "that".

36
Reply74 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 27

Thank you, OneVerce!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

This is very good. It will take me a while to integrate this knowledge into usage, but it's good to have a "rule of thumb" and some explanation. Thanks!

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
  • 16
  • 2
  • 2

that is very helpful, gracias

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zendryn
Zendryn
  • 17
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

Thanks for the explanation, it was really helpful.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

This is a great answer to something that has puzzled me for a very long time! Thank you!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leungkwanpang
leungkwanpang
  • 19
  • 14
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Gracias

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 27

Thanks so much for this explanation, and for doing the research, rmcgwn! Wow, your explanation helps me to really understand the difference and proper usage of these two, que and de que! OneVerce's input is also helpful, and I'm thankful. But I find your input much, much more understandable (to me) because I could see it laterally with the English grammar. Thank you!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

It is funny, in English we say "I am sure of that.", but we take out "of" when we specify what "that" is. "I am sure that you have much more to give."

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ych0130517

Is 'I am sure that you have much more for giving' correct?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Not really.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

No. A native English speaker will /feel/ that this is wrong without at first knowing why. In English, we often exclude repetitive information in our sentence structure. The sentence, "I am sure that you have much more for giving," has the meaning, "I am sure that you have much more [things] for giving." See what happened there? Look at the parts of speech for the phrase "have much more things," "[verb][adverb][adjective][noun]." "have much" is heard as a phrase over "much more" being recognized. Something harder to explain is why "for" is not as good a translation for "para" in this case as the word "to." There's an issue with you switching the English tense from a strictly infinitive tense to a progressive tense, also. The sentence could be awkwardly patched as, "I am sure that you have many more things for giving away," but this is not as simple or clear as, "I am sure that you have much more to give."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 27

Uhmmm... what's an "infinitive" tense? Infinitive isn't a tense... maybe you meant "infinitive form"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danpont
danpont
  • 11
  • 10
  • 4

I translated this, "I'm sure that he has much more to give" and was denied. Would that have to be the formal, "tiene?"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Tienes is second person so it would be 'you'. Tiene is he/she/it/formal you. So this sentence requires 'you have'.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

Por que necesitas "para" antes de "dar"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Apparently it can be used to indicate purpose, intent, usefulness or need. http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/para.htm

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

Yeah, we use "for" or "to" in English to indicate purpose, but it seems superiorly simpler in Spanish with just "para."

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andinoe
andinoe
  • 14
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

How would you say "the most to give"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexwazzu

Is that how most spanish speakers sound when they say "tienes"? It sounded like it said "de que tee nes"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianaGlas2

Is it possible to say for this sentence, I am sure that you have much more to offer?....I said this and got it wrong.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

to offer - ofrecer

to give - dar

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.j.banks

de que.......................

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LBracht
LBracht
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9

omg... I wrote offer and duoling did not accept...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

to offer - ofrecer

to give - dar

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dopoqob
dopoqob
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9

Hey now, let's not get greedy.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/royj51
royj51
  • 23
  • 1302

Said the tax man...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madix99

I just noticed that many terms expressing emotion use "de que" -

I'm glad that you came (me alegro de que...)

She's grateful that you brought food (ella está agradecida de que....)

I'm relived that the rain stopped (me aliviada de que...)

We were sad that he died (estábamos tristes de que muriera)

I think I can remember "de que" in this context. this is google translation - I can't swear to correctness.

0
Reply3 months ago