Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Allí se han preparado."

Translation:They have prepared there.

-6
5 years ago

102 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Aljoja
Aljoja
  • 25
  • 23
  • 1015

This sentence in English does not make sense to me. Wouldn't it be better to translate it as "They have prepared themselves there."?

120
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

That is exactly how I translated the sentence and it was accepted. The verb requires an object and the verb "prepararse" (To prepare oneself) provides the sentence exactly that.

"They have prepared themselves there" works very well.

57
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

Same here.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

How about: they have got prepared

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristina821524
Kristina821524
  • 20
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4

For that to be correct English, it would have to be "They have gotten prepared." I am not sure how that would translate to the Spanish exactly.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shb65

"Gotten" is fairly common in America but it's very rarely used in England

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stef587743

i just had to google gotten, i didn't realize it was a word, i just thought when someone said it, it was poor English lol

1
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristina821524
Kristina821524
  • 20
  • 17
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4

So "They have got prepared" would be how they would say it in England? When my students read books I sometimes get questions on the spelling/grammar, so I want to make sure I understand you clearly so I can pass on the info when they ask! :)

-1
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shb65

Hi Kristina821524. "They have got prepared" is technically correct, but doesn't sound very natural in English English. "They have got ready"would be more common ... or "they have prepared".

-1
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 248

I have looked up my previously used comment on "gotten":

  • "gotten" is definitely English. It is rarely used nowadays in most English-speaking areas, although it is common in the phrase "ill-gotten gains".
  • "got" and "gotten" are past participles of get; both date back to Middle English; "got/gotten" is still used in the USA (particularly midlands and southern regions), where "got" relates to possession and "gotten" relates to acquisition. However, most English speakers worldwide consider "gotten" is now an obsolete orphan from the eighteenth century.

It doesn't help that "got" and "gotten" are frequently used wrongly. In fact marianne.w4 and Kristina821524 have both used mis-used "got/gotten" - at least in their 18th Century meaning. The clue is that "They have possessed prepared" and "They have acquired prepared" make no sense.
(Please don't take my comment personally, you two. It is just a feature of our constantly changing language. I would be happy to see it adopted generally, even though "get" is such a catch-all word that this construction is actually largely idiomatic and must be so difficult for English-learners to understand --- rather like French-learners struggle with "il y a" or the use of "en".)

Also "gotten" is often used by some people just to wind up any neighbours and colleagues who like to think they are better educated and more enlightened. :-)

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pia.damsgaard

I wrote the same and was marked wrong

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 248

Including "themselves" does help, but the main reason it looks odd in English is because it is a sentence that would only be used in context, either where "there" has already been identified, or in dialogue where there is a "there" to point to.

There are many examples like this in the Duolingo exercises. I get the impression that the compilers have simply lifted many of the sentences from a translated text without any appreciation that in isolation they look like nonsense.
That was certainly the problem with the former Translation exercises where we were expected to translate sentence by sentence rather than addressing the whole text like a real translator would do. (It is a shame that, instead of fixing this, the Translation exercises were scrapped altogether. With a little more effort and some common sense it could actually have been transformed into a valuable feature.)

The best way to treat these "nonsense" sentences is to ignore any meaning and just concentrate on the vocabulary and grammar.

7
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MargaretCa12555

It would be better to name the place. They have prepared (place). It could be the room. The yard. etc.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToniVeinticinco

I never had the opportunity to do any translation work, but I think you must be right. I have always been amazed at the amount of "nonsense" sentences I've found. I even had questions about whether Spanish-speaking people would even say things like that since many of the sentences would be of so little use in English. Your post actually makes sense, and I thank you for it.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnlamb

I think it does make sense, although I don't know when you would ever use it.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
  • 21
  • 12
  • 9
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 191

They have prepared there (ahead of time), instead of waiting to prepare here at the last minute.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katrina484421

"we should put on the play at the theatre down the street, they've prepared there."

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cclehnen

I just put 'There they prepared themselves' and it was accepted (Sep '14)

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markgjensen

i'm beginning to think the folks at dl live in washington or colorado.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beki15

Why do you say that?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nihongoneko14
Nihongoneko14
  • 17
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Markgjensen, I live in one of those states o.o. But why do you think that for?

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andyv24
andyv24
  • 17
  • 15
  • 9

I think it is a marijuana reference...I guess he wasn't a fan of the sentence.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

or of cannabis...

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethJohn

Se often translates as herself , himself or themselves

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Aljoja: Yes, I agree.

-1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wilma2000

It's Wrong!

-7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

In English you talk about "preparing" without any object, but not in Spanish. So if you aren't preparing something in particular, you have to use the reflexive.

Also you could translate this as 'They have been prepared there," which is accurate and Duolingo accepts. It's the passive use of the reflexive.

23
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Do all Spanish verbs work this way? If there isn't a verb specified, then it is reflexive?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Amigo duolearner12345: A reflexive verb is one in which the action reflects back upon the subject. Some verbs are always reflexive and will be shown that way in a dictionary: bañarse, for example, and will marked by the "se" on the end of the verb. Others are not always reflexive, but can be made reflexive by adding the "se" (like in the sentence we are talking about on this page). There are other uses of the "se" like making the verb passive instead of active, but that is another semester. So, in this sentence, look for the "se". When the verb is conjugated the "se" is removed from the infinitive and placed in front of the verb. You can think of the "se" as "themselves" although you do not have to translate the actual word. In other sentences, the "se" could also mean "himself", "herself" or "yourself" or "yourselves" depending on context. So, literally this sentence could be translated: "There, themselves they have prepared." but that doesn't sound right in English, so we just change the word order a bit and get: "There they have prepared (themselves)"

15
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Is this the general case for Spanish reflexive verbs? That (assuming there aren't other markers in the sentence to clarify the distinction) there is ambiguity in the meaning of sentences with reflexive verbs: it could be that the object of the verb is the speaker, or it could be that the sentence is in passive voice?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yangzi
yangzi
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14

I misheard "allí" as "ahí".

Here something on the difference from About.com: Although allí and ahí can sound similar in regions where the ll sound is softened and they are often translated the same in English, you should be careful not to confuse them. Ask a native Spanish speaker, ¿Qué pasa ahí? ("What's happening there?"), and the person will likely look in his or her vicinity. But ¿Qué pasa allí? (which you might translate as "What's happening over there?") will have the person looking in the distance.

In more detail: The three choices [for the English words "here" and "there"] are aquí, roughly the equivalent of "here"; ahí, roughly the equivalent of "there" when speaking of an object or action that is close to the person being spoken to; and allí, roughly the equivalent of "there" or "over there" when speaking of an object that is distant from both the speaker and the person being spoken to. Note also that ahí is sometimes used to refer to something emotionally close rather than simply physically close to the listener, so allí can suggest emotional as well as physical distance.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galesl

I put "over there" and was marked wrong :(

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 961

022/12/14 There are also allá and acá , which the people I know (mostly from northern Mexico) use much more often than aquí, allí or ahí, even in the context of moving tables and chairs around a room and asking if they should be put here or there.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

Worse, I heard it as «aquí». I thought I'd got these alternative pronunciations worked out by now but obviously not. :-(

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I answered They have prepared over there. Alli = there,over there. Marked wrong. Hmmm!

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowKey99

I made the same error. Are we missing something? To me, our wrong answer makes more sense when spoken in English.

Person 1: They have prepared there.

Person 2: What? Over where?

Person 1: Why over THERE of course!

Person 2: Why didn't you just say that to begin with?

Person 1: Because I was marked wrong the first time. XD

OK, so comedy aside, what did we actually do wrong? I'm asking. Any takers?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MRinaldi11

Aqui = here Alli = there Alla = over there

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 248

You ask "what did we actually do wrong?", LowKey99.

The answer is "nothing". The mess-up is all down to the DL authors/compilers who frequently include sentences that look like nonsense when they are taken out of context.

Don't get distracted by trying to guess any meaning, just concentrate on the vocabulary and grammar.

I also find it useful when someone proposes a better version, but sadly I don't believe DL has the resources to actually incorporate our suggestions into the course very often.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 2

"They have gotten ready there" was wrong. Anyone know why?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dsmilleresq

I think that should be correct. To "get ready" is the same as to "prepare oneself" but it sounds more natural and seems like it would be used more in casual conversation. I think DL's translation of "they have prepared there" doesn't capture the reflexive nature of the verb as well as "they have gotten ready there."

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

There they have gotten ready. Is that a bad translation?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anglobrasileiro

the sentence means They have prepared (that place) there, (for a party). (for example) But the way the sentence is put, it is not instructive at all. DL is translating like a computer program and not interpreting for a full understanding . In my humble opinion!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

No, sorry Amigo Anglobrasileiro: It does not mean they prepared the place, etc. It means they prepared THEMSELVES. That is what the "se" means. It is reflexive which means the action reflects back on the subject. In my humble opinion, DL has given a perfectly good sentence.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Anglo, Do not be humble when you are right!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

My answer "There they have prepared themselves" was accepted but I have little confidence this is a meaningful translation. Perhaps someone whose native language is Spanish can help out.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Samuel: That is a good translation (because it is the same one I used!!) and accepted by Duo.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

It is a good translation.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alan844763

I said exactly the same on 02/07/18 and it was not accepted! Reported.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagetarian

Can "allí" come at the end of the sentence? "Se han preparado allí."? Is one form used more often than another?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cemdo3

Why is "You (pl) have prepared there" wrong?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottonevilleo

I'd be able to pass this unit a lot quicker if the answers made sense..

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee29724
Dee29724
  • 20
  • 15
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Could this be you (plural) instead of they

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahSalaz7

I am

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahSalaz7

M er

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol870492

Wrong because I put "there" at the beginning and not the end???

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

got it right, but it sure is dumb

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No coma after the "Allí", is very misleading for me.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krupa85

The sentence is incomplete. If it was for example: they have prepared food there, would be better. so hard to figure out what they mean. some sentences are so stupid and unpractical

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krupa85

The sentence is incomplete. If it was for example: they have prepared food there, would be better. so hard to figure out what they mean. some sentences are so stupid and unpractical

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 19

Answered "They've been prepared there." which was accepted too, but is it really an accurate translation?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

As a translation using the "passive se" it's correct. For some reason, however, it is no longer (6/2018) being accepted.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moonchyldcrab82

The translation of this sounds awkward and strange. Maybe it makes sense in Spanish but in English this is a clumsy sentence.

0
Reply3 years ago