1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Loro sono contro di lui."

"Loro sono contro di lui."

Translation:They are against him.

November 12, 2014

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JakeCollier2626

I think the di family can be thought of as if they mean "relative to". This fits with "of" and "from", and helps "contro di lui" (aginst him) and "verso di lui" (towards him) make a bit more sense.

Please correct me if I'm wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HereWithJoeCarl

I feel if that's the case, maybe I shouldn't have gotten it correct by just saying "They are against him" because that makes it seem like they don't like him.

The "di" should be required as it qualifies the phrase as saying that they are "Opposite from him" as in they are in on the other side?

I don't know. I'm confused...

Is this a spacial saying, or an emotional one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skittlzz

"di" is used in front of personal pronouns, e.g. verso di lui. In other cases, such as with objects, it is not used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XlUi8bZ7

Thanks for cleaning that up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meandmyshadow0

Surely putting "Di" there makes it, "of him". I can't understand why the"Di" is needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celena.s

That helps. Thanks :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onntastic

Yes, why "di lui?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skittlzz

"di" is used in front of personal pronouns (such as lui)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bsuz2011

Why not 'They are opposite of him?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meandmyshadow0

Not of him, opposite to him. Of him is bad grammar in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corazon385

Does 'Contro' implied as against meaning next to or does it mean adversely, like an enemy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/missmeminks

Just asked my Italian boyfriend- it can mean either, just like in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Noah

Most likely, if someone wants to say "with him," they will use "con lui." However, when it is being stated that it is one thing against another, "contra" would be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsouthern

Why not "Loro sono contro lui"? What is the reason for using "di lui"? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backthen

It seems to just be idiomatic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skittlzz

I think that "di" is used in front of personal pronouns, like "lui"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jarpletz

impressive streaks both of you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AddyMoreno

In Spanish we can also say it the same... ellos estan en contra de el


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/safibta

I find myself uttering this sentence while I am walking, driving, meditating, etc. I don't know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maddim

Why "they are opposite of him" is wrong? We cannot use it for location?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

You are maybe thinking of Spanish. 'Contro' doesn't mean 'opposite, in front of' in Italian. Only 'against'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beveret1

It says contro can mean with or against. How do you know which one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aggonzalez74

It doesnt mean with


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBareBears

I suppose you can determine what to use based on the context of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

Agreed. Like in combattono con il nemico ('they fight with the enemy'), where con actually means contro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebekah.rice

how does contro mean with or against?? i dont understand that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skittlzz

contro means against, con means with :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chanwxin

You are with me or against me... How does this work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenataRMello

Lui = He; di lui = him (I guess)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MLarson2

Funny thing, i accidentally wrote luo instead of lui, and duo didn't notice. Is there a luo that i haven't learned yet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cangurina777

I translated this as, "They are opposite from him." I do not understand why Duolingo said my answer is incorrect, because, "contro" can also mean opposite. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

contro means 'opposite' when it means 'against', not 'in front of'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeathWilder

I got the same. Not sure the semantics that make it incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gareth154258

I wrote "They are opposed to him" and it was wrong. Really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janczo_

I had "They are against to him" and I think it just sounds bad in English but your answer seems fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RmnCrz

So, how would it be "they are against his" (his anger, his smell, etc... something that has been refered before, a possessive pronoun)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

Possessive pronouns look exactly like possessive adjective (that is article + possessive adjective) :-)
Loro sono contro il/la/i/gli suo/sua/suoi/sue


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erin.s.c503

I understand that 'loro' is more widely used but does Duolingo even teach us 'essi/esse'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muttley_

You will rarely hear essi/esse in Italy. They are only used in 'heavy' texts (Italian authors in Wikipedia seem to like them) but they nonetheless sound unnatural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynn166419

No need to say "di", because "contro lui" is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meandmyshadow0

Why is di needed, as it means of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rob244586

Does this not mean "they are contrary to him." as in taking an opposing view?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter787755

I got this question twice in a row (I'll be in different ways) and the first time left out 'di' and got it correct. Just saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domdom4499

That makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan97

poor guy! whatever did HE do? :o

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.