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  5. "Wir sehen jedes Ei."

"Wir sehen jedes Ei."

Translation:We see every egg.

June 29, 2013

103 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SomethingUnique

NSA: Chicken Edition


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki266459

That's a lot of eggs then...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki266459

And wasn't every "alle"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeCisner

You can think about it this way:

In order to use alle (= all), you would have to use the plural of egg, as in "We see all eggs" "Wir sehen alle Eier".

In contrast, you can use jedes (=every) with the singular form of egg, as in this exercise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quinn254356

So "Wir sehen alle Eier" is still a correct sentence, yes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandeepa2

Danke schön


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictoriaJoy95

Good explanation thank you very much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inbon

More like Bundesnachrichtendienst, NSA German counterpart


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RithvikYag

Now that's a long word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandro1660207

You may call it BND


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonI24

Eye Spy: E G G


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lincedin

Why does "we are seeing every egg" not work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleFake

"Seeing" has a different meaning, such as "have". I will try to explain as best as i can.

In English, see or have are tricky things. For example "I am seeing her" means "I am dating with her" As like in here, "We are seeing every egg" CAN mean (I'm not 100% sure) "we are dating with every egg" (!?)

Like in having, "I am having an apple" means "I'm eating an apple" BUT you say "I have a computer" instead of "I'm having a computer" because it can mean "I am eating a computer"

I'm quoting these from a moderator who explained this situation in a different discussion from the previous lessons.

I hope it helped...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madeleinejayne

Seeing=dating is only true when talking about people (in most centexts.) Aside from being an uncommon way of phrasing it; we are seeing every egg = we see every egg. And having only means eating when refering to food. Im having a computer = i (will) have a computer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArunK6

Actually, 'see' used in the progressive tense can have another meaning, as in 'I am seeing things' which means 'I am hallucinating'. Grammatically I think it's incorrect to use 'see' in the progressive in usual contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoemyZambratta

It is grammatically correct, but semantically (or pragmatically) incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

Often but not always. See comments below.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notstarboard

There are definitely cases where it's used though, even in some pretty normal situations. For example, if you're in a group and one person notices something amazing and/or strange in the process of happening, they might say, "Whoa, are you guys seeing this?"

Now, here's another situation with a different meaning of the verb. My mom asks, "Hey notstarboard, what is your brother up to?" I reply, "He's seeing if he can find the sock he lost in the wash."

Edit: And what about the futuristic present (i.e. "I am seeing the show next weekend")? I know it's usually used with a word or phrase showing when the action will happen ("next weekend" in my example), but in response to the question "What are you doing this weekend?" you wouldn't need to specify. I would assume this is the same in German, but I don't know for sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danwhitley52

The first example that came into my head was describing the content of a display to someone who can't see it; if your friend is outside repairing the tv aerial you might say "I'm seeing a picture now" to tell them it's working.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawbuid

I'm having a baby = I'm about to give birth. I have a baby = A baby is part of my family. I'm having a ball = I'm enjoying myself/I'm about to give birth to a ball.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KogtistiyG

I'm having a xenomorph, from the egg I saw earlier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jurgen406499

you forget: iam having a baby = iam eating a baby. respect our culinaric diversity!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e4j

I am wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoC

Wondering the samee here!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salstjarna

It should, in a sense, be accepted. Though they do (or I should say can) mean two different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

Thanks to your comment, I am seeing this whole discussion in a new light. I have seen this discussion before, so I must admit I am not seeing it for the first time.

Sometimes the progressive does work in English easily with verbs like wonder, but even with verbs such as see where it isn't normally used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyGilrean

It's an awkward phrasing to start with. It sounds almost trippy in my opinion. In English, especially in written English, we try to avoid using forms of "to be" when possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dzhuanhuo

No we don't. We use it quite often really. Take this German sentence: "Ich trinke Milch von der Kuh." Instead of saying "I drink milk from the cow", in English we say "I am drinking milk from the cow. The only pattern I found where we don't like forms of "Be" is when the verb after it cannot be conjugated, like the verb "can".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gbiggsmall

Which sounds easier if you were to be learning introductory English "We see every egg" or "We are seeing every egg"? The former, of course. When you're filling these out, imagine being in grade school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osher32

I think it's because you cannot say in english "to be seeing", like you cannot say "I am feeling" or "It is tasting". Can't remember the general name of those verbs, maybe passive verbs. You don't really do some kind of action in those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

I am tasting and It is tasting are in the progressive. The progressive present indicates that something is currently happening. However, the simple present indicates that is does happen, but maybe not right at that very moment. I taste the chocolate cake. - I taste chocolate cake if it is put in front of me (This is also used as the literary present.). I am tasting the chocolate cake. - Currently, at the very moment the statement is made, I am eating a piece of chocolate cake. Maybe not the best manners, but it indicates that it happens now, not on occasion. Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glenneroo

Or why not "we are looking at every egg" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salstjarna

Because looking and seeing are two different things. </philosophical babble>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CsabaDaday

Well actually they are different things and it's a distinction present in (almost?) all languages. To see is more like things are going in and out of our view and we see whatever is in front of us at that point, while looking at implies some sort of active participation. You are looking at something because you want to. This is not really babble, although I know that me asserting it does not suffice to prove it. :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wafflecotton

Yes, warum nicht? I thought Sehen also translates as "looking at".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arachnophobian

If I'm correct (Imma bit rusty, soo double check me) "sehen" is to "see", "anschauen" is "too look at".

It's also separable AND reflexive (in the Dativ case), which makes things more complicated, which is why they haven't taught it yet.

Ich sehe das Ei. = I see the egg.

Ich schaue mir das Ei an. = I am looking at the egg.

I mean, in the end though, if you see the egg, it's most likely safe to assume you're looking at it....

..... probably....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arachnophobian

Also, please, if I screwed up the grammar (I hate grammar. Grammar hates me.) someone please fix it and reply to me so I know about it. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugenePankov

They are generally interchangeable. sehen/schauen = see; ansehen/anschauen = look; sich ansehen/sich anschauen = take a look at. Although my northwestern German friends seem to prefer -schauen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tryaudio

Seeing just doesn't fit in this context. But in English it's okay to say this: "I'm seeing the doctor". Which means "I regularly see the doctor"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yassine.ba

Seeing has anther meaning : im seeing a girl means im dating her


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mihaifx

another meaningless sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinDoubleU

Early DuoLingo sentences aren't meant to be practical, they're meant to force you to consider how to put together the few words and their forms you know at this stage. It's not rote memorization of phrases, it's learning language building blocks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WmHitt

I like Martins attitude. I think the chat room discussion is key to the whole DuoLingo approach. So mabe you can tell me, what do we do with the up or down arrows at the end of each comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iddylu

Upvoting and downvoting. You hit the up arrow if the comment is useful, and the down arrow if it's not useful. If a comment gets too many downvotes it gets hidden at the bottom of the page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickRansom

Seriously. I love duolingo, but I went to a German meetup and literally 80% of my vocabulary was worthless. I would love more sentences like 'Where do you come from?' or 'What are you doing with my wallet?'.

Useful sentences. Anyway. Sorry for the rant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iddylu

Like MartinDoubleU said, I think Duolingo is meant to give you more of a grammatical foundation than to be a vocabulary-builder. In theory, you could take what you learned here and then grab a dictionary to learn the words you actually want/need to know, and you'd have more of an idea of how to go about it because Duolingo would have already taught you a bit about how to construct sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Picardsflute

Someone has to keep an Ei on them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shalafandaquisha

IS ANYONE ELSE NOT WONDERING WHY THEY CAN SEE EVERY EGG


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattwhiskers

ALL YOUR EGGS ARE BELONG TO US


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Triunn_Maegin

ALL YOUR BELONGS ARE EGGS TO US


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_Bacon03

ALLE IHRE EIER GEHÖREN UNS!!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/6autodidact

Why is it "jedes" and not "jede"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex_83

"das Ei" / "Wir sehen jedes Ei"

"die Katze" / "Wir sehen jede Katze"

"der Hund" / "Wir sehen jeden Hund"

Watch the table on the right: http://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/jeder


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PollyPeanut

When could this sentence ever be uttered?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tangopoptart

Egg inspectors talking about their job? We see every egg that leaves this factory!

... that's the best I've got.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rrrGerrrman

"You cannot see every and one of the eggs, because we never put them in the same basket!" "We see every egg." "But how?!" "With security cameras."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auth_Hiril

In assuring your Grandma that you and your siblings will manage to bring eggs from the chicken coop properly? Just a thought.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabyo

but Ei is singular... Eier is plural!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandrasCity

But "jedes" = every

Even in English, you would say "We see every egg" not "We see every eggs".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scatalina

In English "We see every eggs" does not sound right. I think the correct version is " We see all the eggs"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebecca908285

My German partner says this is a German saying, with a similar meaning to "All the cards are on the table", or, "Everything is out in the open".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NF6FxQcs

It makes sense. Thanks for sharing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

Must be a local thing then, I have never heard it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arhj1

why doesn't it accept the translation "we see every ovum"? when you hover over "Ei" it lists that as one of the meanings. I used it out of curiosity but I guess I was supposed to guess that we can't see every ovum, just every egg....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/foo__bar

Haha, that could even make sense: scientists are sharing their breakthrough in ovum observation field, saying: "We see every ovum! Yass! YASS!" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg.sandy

Not to swamp you guys with too much info but..it is "das" Ei the gender is "neuter". This means jede takes the form of jedes. The good thing about this is in the nom., acc, and gen case jede stays jedes in the "das" neuter form. Except in the Dative case where it changes to jedem. In the masc. "Der" and fem. "Die" gender jede ending changes quite a bit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen620808

In the hearing exercises, if someone listens to the exercise 5 or maybe 10 times, it could switch to a different voice. For the life of me, I cannot hear the male voice when he trails off at the ends of his sentences


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramshorn8

Why does" we are are looking at each egg 'not work


[deactivated user]

    That's right little eggs, we see every one of you, and we will stab you with a fork and eat you all up!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faharanik

    I'm wondering why I can't use "We CAN see every egg" here. This usually works for me in other sentences containing the verb "sehen".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

    Because "we can see every egg" would translate to " Wir können jedes Ei sehen"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/espoclark

    What is the difference between jede and jedes?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Gender.

    jeder Mann (masculine), jede Frau (feminine), jedes Kind (neuter)

    jeder Hund, jede Katze, jedes Pferd; jeder Löffel, jede Gabel, jedes Messer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aeubanks2

    Sprichst du Deutsch, Bataille?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeshavPrabhu

    Difference between jede/jeder/jedes?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The form depends on the gender of the following noun.

    For example, jeder Hund (masculine) - jede Katze (feminine) - jedes Pferd (neuter).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aqeel_N

    how I can understand jedes, jeden etc


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeynab614989

    why not "wir sehen jeden Ei?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because Ei is a neuter word and jeden is the masculine accusative form -- you need the neuter accusative form jedes before Ei.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coonoco

    Why "jedes Ei" and not "jede Ei"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because Ei is neuter, not feminine or plural.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_Bacon03

    WE SEE EEEVVVRRYYYTHHIINNNGGG......


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dsauve411

    I'm only curious why in English every egg, egg don't have an s


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because that's how "every" works in English: it's followed by a singular noun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elmedic

    i should have asked this a long time ago, but what's with the s on jedes? what purpose does it serve??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    It matches the neuter gender of the noun Ei.

    jeder Apfel (masculine), jede Katze (feminine), jedes Ei (neuter).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcgrewrich

    How could we see every egg? That is a LOT of eggs if we mean every egg on the planet.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Usually, such quantifiers are relative to a specific, smallish "universe" of objects, not to everything in the entire universe.

    For example, all the eggs that someone bought. Or all the eggs that Farmer Smith's hens laid this morning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akamoto-san

    Every Duo-sentence like this makes me feel shame.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LJlala

    What's the difference between jedes and jede? When do I add the s at the end??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
    • Masculine nouns: jeder Mann, jeder Löffel, jeder Hund, ...
    • Feminine nouns: jede Frau, jede Gabel, jede Katze, ...
    • Neuter nouns: jedes Mädchen, jedes Messer, jedes Pferd, ...

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unnamedharald

    The pronunciation of 'jedes' is pretty hard to fathom even on turtle speed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcialori

    Ei is singular...strange


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Ei is singular...strange

    Why do you find that strange?

    Would you say "every eggs" with plural "eggs" after "every" in English?

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