"Tugann an cócaire comhrá don phóilín."

Translation:The cook holds a conversation with the policeman.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

I hear "go" not "don" I listened to it about 5 times and changed "don" to "go" and was marked wrong. The only positive is that instinctively I knew "don" was right after all these lessons.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Would "The cook has a conversation..." also work here? The hint for "tugann" is "give".

Also, shouldn't "police officer" be accepted as correct? (I reported this, since I know it should.) Curious to know: would policewoman also be accepted as correct here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shelagh198227

the cook holds a conversation with the police officer should definitely be accepted, particularly as you are not allowed to distinguish between male and female officers

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenpai-neko
Jenpai-neko
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I feel like this speaker has the habit of pronouncing "don" as "go" or "gon". Is that a dialectical pronunciation? Otherwise it just throws me off what the rest of the sentence is saying.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Troublesum1
Troublesum1
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In this thread, there's a discussion about how that particular consonant substitution is a feature that is specific to Connacht Irish:

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/5395462

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bredacm

She definitely says "go" and not "don". I keep falling for this!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonDunne2

I said the cook converses with the policeman - wrong

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gliddon
gliddon
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"Police officer" for "phóilín" was rejected.

How curious that all police officers in Ireland are men...lol...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_McG
Paul_McG
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In Ireland a police officer would be called a 'Guard', from the police force being An Garda Síochána. In the past female officers were called 'bangardaí' [women guards]. A nurse is a 'banaltra' for the same reason ['foster-woman', basically].

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanscian
seanscian
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This is another rage-inducer.

After being marked wrong time and again in other questions because “There do not be enough that is literal there when talking there with that,” I get this one wrong because the cook gives a conversation to the police…

Make up your mind, Duolingo.

3 weeks ago
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