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"I know she wishes it very much."

Translation:Yo sé que ella lo desea mucho.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cleespann

why the "que"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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The 'que' is there to mean 'that'; In English we can leave it out but in Spanish it is mandatory.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tristan.be

I agree - I put the que in just because it 'felt right' but can not really explain why. Could it be possible that the 'que' breaks up two verbs so that you can conjugate both? Ie. "Yo se' ella desea" looks wrong with the two verbs conjugated for different people?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oletuv

The "que" is needed for joining two clauses having different subjects.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katia3787

Se que means I know that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whitehall6407

I wrote muchísimo because very much was requested and it was marked incorrect DL needs to accept correct answers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

Is it never correct to write muy mucho for ´very much` ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, it's always incorrect. You can say "mucho" or "muchísimo", but not "muy mucho".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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"Mucho" works as "a lot", so writing "very a lot" doesn't make sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Neither do double negatives make sense, but Spanish still calls for them. Just because the literal translation seems awkward in English doesn't necessarily make it wrong. Although in this case I think you are right! :o)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

This translation is not correct. "mucho + much (or "a lot"), not "very much".

"Very much" would be "muchísimo".

I have reported this to Duo.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katia3787

I totally agree with you. I put muchisimo and got it wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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How do you know whether to use "le" or "lo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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I'm not English or Spanish native speaker so I might be wrong, but theoretically, lo is masculine direct object pronoun and le is indirect object pronoun. However, it's hard for someone having English as second language and poor in syntax to distinguish them :(

They say generally dO is the thing taking action from subject while iO is the receiver of the action.

e.g. I give him the ring the ring = dO him = iO lo doy él (a la anillo)

Hope it helps

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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That's almost right. However the indirect object pronoun always comes first:
El anillo es de oro. Se lo doy a él. - The ring is golden. I give it to him.

Se - to him (normally it would be le, but have a look at http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iodopro.htm)
Lo - it (refers to el anillo)
A él - to him again (required with iO pronoun); note the personal a

Also, try putting two spaces at the end of each line of your example to make the linebreaks work.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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Thanks for improving my answer :) Well I did put a line break, but it seems my app only recognise double lime spacing

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Razso

what's wrong with using "le" instead of "lo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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"Le" is an indirect object pronoun and "lo"/"la" are used as direct object pronouns. In the sentence "She wishes it" "it" is a direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1MooreLingo

Would "Yo sé que ella lo espera mucho" imply the same meaning? Or is "espera" not proper to use here? Because I know it also means "to hope for." -Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juliette796636

Why not conozco?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1MooreLingo

Conocer is "to know," you're right, but we use conocer when referring to being acquainted to people, or places. Saber is "to know" a skill, or how to do something, or knowing information. Hope that helps Juliette.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juliette796636

That’s really helpful, thank you!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MathDr91
MathDr91
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I thought the "dictionary" said pide meant wish, so why is that wrong and desea correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

"pide" comes from "pedir" which means "to request or ask for", but not "wish"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fringer
fringer
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What is wrong with using creo instead of sé for I know?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

"To know" = saber

"To think" = creer

It's not the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fringer
fringer
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I know that's what they're going for here, but I don't feel that's fully accurate. I think of pensar as "to think" and creer as "to believe." And in my mind to believe = to know. --so, I think my issue is finding a way to separate the connection between "to believe" and "to know."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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In English the difference is one of personal opinion or expectation (believe) versus to be absolutely certain (know). If you say "I know that..." and someone proves it to be wrong, then you were clearly mistaken. But you can "believe" anything you want whether or not it is supported by fact.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ANG66

Why not "Yo se' que ella lo desea tanto"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tf2811

Tanto means 'so much' and I think, like the English, always suggests the idea of a comparison being made. Like 'he wants it so badly' really means 'He wants it so badly (that he will...)', or 'I love you so much' really means 'I love you so much (that I would...)'. Tanto is used in Spanish in the same way to make comparisons, but when the second half of the comparison isn't important, like in those English examples I just gave, it'll be omitted. Strictly speaking, though, in the same way that 'very much' doesn't mean exactly the same as 'so much', even if they both mean 'a lot', 'tanto' doesn't equal 'mucho'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tf2811

What's wrong with 'Yo sé que lo desea mucho', without the pronoun 'ella'? I can think of a few circumstances where the context makes the pronoun redundant, so shouldn't it be accepted here as a correct translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Nothing wrong if we already know that we are talking about her by the context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/comradezack

As a native English speaker, this sentence looks like something you'd hear from a toddler that doesn't yet know the word "want". A better English translation would be "I know that she desires it very much."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattHarri

I used sabo for I know. I'm not sure why that's wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Saber is an irregular verb - the 1st person singular is "sé"

http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/saber

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattHarri

Thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liele1
Liele1
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Why is it wrong to use mucha here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Mucho only changes gender when it's an adjective in front of a feminine noun, like "muchas flores" or "mucha comida"

When a word is just used in a general way, it defaults to masculine.

What does she wish for? "It/Lo" What gender is "it"? Masculine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ImanNassar

The exercise said 'very much'. Shouldn't be translated to bastante mucho or muy mucho. The duolingo answer was just 'mucho'.... what about the 'very'? Please help.... Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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According to online sources that I found 'very much' translated to 'muchísimo'. So the translation seems wrong. I can't report it, myself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ImanNassar

thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brentmcd
brentmcd
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Things that Donald Trump says?

8 months ago