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  5. "Ólann na cait uisce."

"Ólann na cait uisce."

Translation:The cats drink water.

November 12, 2014

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

There's no use of the genitive in this sentence. Does anyone know if this was put here for learners to recognize different uses for cait?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

cait is also the plural of cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

Right, I'm just wondering if this was put here to emphasize that cait can be cats or cat's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

No? This sentence only has the interpretation "The cats drink water"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

My initial post was merely speculating why someone would put a sentence in the "Genitive" lesson that does not contain any words in the genitive case. I get that this sentence can only be translated as "The cats drink water".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Ah. I didn't realize this was the genitive lesson. My bad! I misinterpreted it to think you were thinking cait was only genitive. Sorry!

Also, Duolingo really needs to add something that tells you what lesson a sentence being discussed is in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkRose98

Ólann na cait bainne :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrittanyTeeter

Not our cats! Bad things happen if they do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadcan

Why can this only be the cats? How would you say "the cat drinks water".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

Na is the plural definite article (ie, "the") and cait is the plural of cat ("cats" and "cat", respectively). "The cat drinks water" would be Ólann an cat uisce.

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