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"Usted creía en José."

Translation:You used to believe in José.

3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

I used to believe in José, but then I realized I was the only one. Everyone else says, "No way, José!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Manny.Delgado
Manny.Delgado
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Every phrase in this category is so bleak like "she used to feel happy" and "we had more friends when we were young" but "you used to believe in José" is just depressing thanks a lot Duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newmilwaukeee

Thought Jose was Spanish for Jesus till i got it wrong. I'm not a clever man.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EddieNezer
EddieNezer
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José is actually a Spanish form of "Joseph".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicPowerHero

The person in the sentence believes in Jesus, just not his daddy.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael_Tavares
Michael_Tavares
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I'm sure José exists.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

All hail José! Punish the unbelievers; they shall understand the might of José when they feel His wrath.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoHepCat
duolingoHepCat
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So, apparently, this means you trust in José's abilities rather than simply believing something he is saying, but in American English, "to believe in fill-in-the-blank" is an idiomatic expression meaning to believe in THE EXISTENCE OF fill-in-the-blank." Is the Spanish version used this way?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greg.yarnell

You used to think about José. You were thinking about José. Aren't these also correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

'creo que ahora me voy a casa' - "I think I will go home now'

'creo que Obama sea un buen presidente' - " I think Obama is a good president"

you can translate 'creer' with 'to think' whenever you can change 'think' with 'believe' in in English too.

In general, "creer" means "to believe" and nothing else in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nanling1
nanling1Plus
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I have the same question, since it was one of the suggested possible meaning in the dropdown hints. A Spanish speaker probably would have used "pensaba" instead of "creia," but I don't know why your/my answer is not technically correct. Any ideas, out there?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabbyDelRio
GabbyDelRio
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I might be wrong, as I am learning as well, but I think there's just a slight differentiation between the words. It's the same in English-- when you believe something, you are thinking it, and vice versa. The two words do mean similar things, but they have slightly different connotations, and that can make two sentences mean different things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishasan2015

What's wrong with "you were trusting Jose"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabbyDelRio
GabbyDelRio
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Creer means "to believe," not "to trust." This verb can be thought of as "to think," because that's usually the context you see it in. In this sentence, it sort of means "You thought Jose could do something." In real life, you'll also often hear people say "Creo que...," meaning "I think that..." or "I believe...."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishasan2015

Thank you! The difference looks quite subtle to me though. But anyway have a lingot! And how do you say "to trust" in Spanish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabbyDelRio
GabbyDelRio
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I think to say "you were trusting Jose," it'd be "Usted estaba confiando en Jose." "Confiar" is to trust, but you often attach "en" with the verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishasan2015

Thanks again!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/armandotij3

That translates to usted se fiaba de jose

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThUit

José isn't Jesus, I suppose. So why "You used to believe José" wouldn't suffice ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabbyDelRio
GabbyDelRio
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Because of the "en," you have to include "in" in your translation, since Duolingo only takes exact translations. So, I guess in this case, José must be something worth believing in. :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Is "you used to believe José" truly incorrect? They mean slightly different things in English (believe him = trusts what he says) (believe in him = trust his abilities). Can the Spanish mean both? Or ... ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Yes, that is incorrect. The Spanish here means the latter of your translations, that is, to trust in his abilities.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lderGibby
lderGibby
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This is the difference in preterite versus imperfect. Because it used imperfect, it implies his abilities, not one event. Because of that you need any "en" to make it grammatically correct, not really to change the meaning, but in English the "in" is important for the imperfect meaning, where we don't have two different conjugations.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lderGibby
lderGibby
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Also believe in jose= creer en jose, believe jose= creer a jose

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tron4lisa3

I used to believe in Duolingo. Lol come on !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drina188

why cant it be "you used to believe Jose" like "Jose I believe you" not "Jose I believe IN you". why the mandatory IN!!?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Because you used to believe José is usted le creía a José. José, I believe you is José yo te creo. José, I believe in you is José, creo en ti.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flu1d

You were believing in Jose? - I dont see the problem with that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

It may be correct English, but I am not sure it would ever be used, while "I used to believe in (Arsene Wenger)..." is really common - at least in English football!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skywatcher10

Yes, but now I am not a cultist.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahAyers

Not anymore!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatheusHam3

qual foi? foi typo, viado.

Se liga, otario

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraWer9

Again frustration with the sound. I say it perfectly (possibly with an American accent) and sometimes it rejects the recording...Arghhh

8 months ago