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"Yo no tengo jabón."

Translation:I do not have soap.

0
5 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/michaelfri
michaelfri
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It just corrected me from "I have no soap" to "I have not soap". I want my heart back! And I'm going to get some soap...

99
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zombiesue

And I have not soap is terrible english o.O

39
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Animecool

This person obviosly has dirty hands.

18
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Animecool

I put "I do not have soap".

12
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PugLove888
PugLove888
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Yo no tengo jabón. Tengo manos sucios.

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conpanbear

"I have not soap" is legitimate English, but I would agree that it isn't colloquial. All these permutations of the same thing should be accepted answers, so flag them :)

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busyrocker

I put "I don't have a soap" and was not accepted

11
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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You can say:

"I don't have soap." (meaning any soap, soap in general)

"I don't have any soap," is also correct in English, and a common way to say it, (but I think the first translation is a more literal translation of the Spanish sentence.)

"I don't have the soap." (referring to some specific soap)

or "I don't have a bar of soap" (because "bar" is a count noun, whereas "soap" by itself is not - in other words, I can say "three bars of soap," but I can't say "three soaps")

But you really wouldn't say, "I have a soap," in English.

Hope this helps.

23
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

To make things slightly more complicated, you can actually say "three soaps" depending on the context. For example, "We offer three soaps in our shop." This would refer to three different kinds of soap, such as three different scents.

6
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joser_
joser_
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Also in Spanish, when an unknown quantity of something is described, the indefinite articles are not used. For example:

¿Hay calabaza en la sopa? - Is there a (any) squash in the soap?
Por favor, ¿tiene jabón para lavar ropa? - Please, do you have laundry soap?

1
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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While a legitimate construction, "have not" is more likely to be found in a more literary or poetic context, but nowadays for everyday written or spoken standard English, it would not really be used.

If someone is learning English, I think it might serve them better to use a more generally recognized construction, such as "I don't have soap," "I have no soap," or "I don't have any soap." That way they'll be understood, and no one will think they're speaking poor English.

Just a suggestion.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

"I have not soap" is not legitimate English, but "I have NO soap" is acceptable.

However, in normal conversation a better translation is:

"I don't have any soap."

UK native English speaker here.

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/been22

Hes a dirty person

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamken

I agree with michaelfri; a native English speaker would always say "I don't have any soap" pamk

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@duo comment community - re: inconsistent answers.

Hola michaelfri. Thanks for posting your answer experience. "I have  NOT soap." is not even grammatical. And having duo suggest that as an answer must have been simultaneously preplexing and infuriating.

I take it that this must have happened awhile back, as the suggested and preferred answers are now both "I don't have soap."

However, this is still a sore point with me because I recently left lengthy comments defending the logic of certain translations only to have duo yank the carpet out from under me.

It's one thing losing a heart to some wacky nonsense like that. But it's another thing entirely when duo leaves you standing out in the cold, looking like a fool.

Here's my two cases in point. 

In the last two Household Items Skill Sets, duo caused a big uproar in the comment section with two sentences in particular:

  1. Yo no tengo espejo.

And

  1. Yo no tengo lavadora.

In the first case, duo's preferred and suggested answers were "I have no mirror." A few commenters argued against the majority that this was a more accurate translation than the more "natural sounding" English sentence "I don't have a mirror." 

The explanation offered by commenters familiar with the nuances of Spanish suggested that this translation captured the essence of a "total lack of" mirrors which was a bit deeper than just not having "a mirror."

This argument sounded pretty compelling to me given that the root sentence did not have the indirect article "un" when it easily could have. So I bought into the idea.

Enter the exercise sentence, "Yo no tengo lavadora." This time duo does a complete flip-flop.

Duolingo's preferred answer to this was "I do not have a washing machines." Now the indefinite article was arbitrarily put back in. 

Huh? But...WTF!

Now here we are and for this exercise sentence it  seems that both the preferred and suggested answers are "I don't have soap." as opposed to "I have no soup." 

Here's a case where there is no indefinite article in the root sentence and no there is no need for one in the target language sentence as soap is a "no-count" noun.

It seems like a minor detail, but how is Spanish "no" actually functioning here? 

In the root language sentence, is Spanish "no" an adverb negating the verb "tengo"?

Or (because Spanish doesn't rely on word order) is Spanish "no" hanging out in front of the verb "tengo", but in actually it's functioning as an adjective modifying  the noun "jabón" (soap)?

I'm at the point now, where I think of languages like Japanese (Nihongo).

Japanese is a verb last language with no plural inflections and not articles. When necessary postposition particles mark the topic and subject (when necessary). Postposition particles also mark objects and indirect objects. Uttering the personal pronoun for "I" is taboo.

You can't get any different from Spanish or English grammar  (except with the possible exception of German.)

Subtleties and nuances would simply be lost in translation. 

(Watashi wa) sekken o motteinai.

(Yo) jabón tengo, no.

I ain't got no soap.

Given duo's inconsistencies, I have to ask my "Why bother?"

And in the end, what difference does it make? Because duo crowd sources the the target language translations, all it take is a wave of people reporting their answers as correct with no other concern besides "that's not the way people talk where I'm from." 

When the magic number of reports has been reached, then these low grade translations that disregard the grammatical structure of the root language and nuances due to emphases which have no parallels in the target language all get ditched while parochial English phrases become canon.

It's very frustrating.

6
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

Proper translation simply is not the same thing as understanding correct grammar in a target language. You seem to want to understand another language's grammar via the grammatical construction of your own language, which simply is not possible.

If "I have no soap", "I don't have soap", "I don't have any soap", "I do not have soap", and "I do not have any soap" are all completely interchangeable in English, it would be wrong to mark some of them as incorrect translations. The meaning is just as fully conveyed by "I don't have soap" as it is by "I have no soap". You cannot discern proper word order in one language from proper word order in another, or else you would be translating "Yo no tengo jabón." as "I no have soap," or "I not have soap" which would be ridiculous. The main thing is simply to understand that the construction for negating a verb in Spanish is no+verb, and the construction for negating a verb in English is to do+not+verb, or in the case of a target noun with no article, it can be verb+no. In English, there is no hierarchy of value or difference in meaning between "do not have" and "have no", only that "have no" cannot be used with a definite article. Therefor, both constructions for the translation are equally correct. They may chose to suggest these different English constructions with different sentences in order to demonstrate that these different constructions are equivalent and accepted in English for the same construction in Spanish.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

(LittleWing) Boy, I can't believe I read the whole comment. But like a bad movie, when I think it has to improve, but doesn't, and I'm too tired to change the channel. :(

Seriously, it's awesome you take this so seriously.

(...and apparently hold a grudge too,..Lol).

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nosungam

It didn't like 'I don't have any soap' either.

14
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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That's what I put. Someone voted you down, but why? I wish people would explain why they vote down. I think it's too easy to just click on these little up/down arrows.

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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I just upvoted you, because I agree. :-D

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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:-) ☺☺

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

because there's no reference of the word, any, in this sentence

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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There's no reference to "any", however, for Americans it just sounds more natural to say "I don't have any soap" instead of "I have no soap" and they both mean exactly the same thing.

http://grammar.reverso.net/E_1_any_and_some.shtml

When used along with the negative, “any” means “none”:

“No, I don't have any money.” (I have no money.)

“No, there aren't any apples in the fridge.” (There are no apples in the fridge.)

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markfocas
markfocas
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I'm with @binerds i would say "I don't have soap". Nobody in Australia says " I don't have a soap ", Now I don't have a heart either

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

Not having soap after you already got in the shower is literally hell. Especially when you forgot to buy soap.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjdplol

Everytime is see "Yo no tengo.." I keep thinking it says "Yo no tango", meaning "I do not tango XD

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anglobrasileiro

I do not have any soap should be allowed . I have not soap is horrible English as michaelfri commented

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarshGupta12

Why it can't be "I do not have a soap".? Because in last lesson, there was a ques, "Yo no tengo secadora". I answered "I do not have a dryer" and it was termed as correct. (Read the top comment in that question, it is explained well) But here, adding "a" is termed as incorrect. Can anyone tell me why.?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nate287775

You could say in english, a bar of soap, where its one item like a dryer. But whether its bar soap or liquid soap, after each use but the last you still have (some awkward to count without exact measurements in grams or ounces) SOME soap

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

This error isn't about proper construction in Spanish, it's about the fact that you are translating. "I do not have a soap" is not proper English, and "I do not have dryer" is not proper English. Soap is not counted, but dryers are.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stud4Life

I'm at the very beginning stages of learning Spanish, and sometimes I am able to use word association or context clues to help memorize words. So, would someone share how to get the word "soap" out of jabón for memorization purposes? For example, "paraguas" is umbrella, and that makes complete sense to me, i.e. root word "agua" or water, and "para" or "for", so one uses an umbrella "for water," or at least to cover oneself from water. Thanks!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiovanniSantucci

If jabón also means fright, could this sentence be translated "I'm not afraid" (Literally "I don't have fright")?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whatalongstory24

You have no soap, I'm not your friend.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stuntbeaver

You would say "I don't have any soap" or "I don't have soap", never "I don't have a soap"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatCatLlama

omg i wrote soup wow i am dumb

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Yeah, soap and soup don't mix really well. :D

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/panpython

In hindi, we call soap as sabun

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blockeegle

Hearts? When do you get hearts...?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mglenn13

When you are testing out of something.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinWierinckx

(yo) no tengo why count the lack of "yo" as a mistake?

person is not always used in Spanish except when it's to point out something * he drinks milk, but I drink water

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hola3245
hola3245
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Jabon=habon. The J makes the sound, "h".

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mark372470

Hahaha

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maia_Francis18

Err. That's rank

0
Reply1 year ago