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"Hoeveel operaties heb jij nodig?"

Translation:How many operations do you need?

0
3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

I've noticed with words like "operaties" that have like -ties on the end sound like "tsies" -- is that really how it is pronounced, do most people add that extra 's' sound in there? It sounds cute. XD

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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That is really how it is pronounced, yes.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Is there a reason for this? Like an old spelling, or a pronunciation rule?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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I'm not sure, but you can see something similar in English, French and German with the ending -tion, where you also get an S sound.

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanihoff
nathanihoff
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Italian and Spanish went ahead and changed the spelling of the Latin "-tion" to reflect pronunciation, moving to "-zione" and "-ción" respectively. Something weird happened with the vulgarization of Latin, and French, English, and apparently Dutch have yet to get with the program by changing the "t" in the spelling of these words.
Latin: operatio(n)- (the n is added in most forms)
Italian: operazione
Spanish: operación
English: operation
Dutch: operatie

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edu_lara
edu_lara
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Portuguese follows the Spanish and Italian forms: operação. I'm really not so sure of this, but I think this 'ts' sound is originally from medieval pronunciation of the Latin 't', which was widespread throughout Europe.

3
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lkjkorn
lkjkorn
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Just to chime in, the equivalent to the Dutch -tie ending is -tion in German (e.g. Operation), and the t is also always pronounced as "ts"

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loxmi
Loxmi
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... as far as I understand, all of those words have a French root, which can explain the transfer of the S(ish) sound.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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According to the OED, operation comes from Old French, which in turn 'borrowed' it from Latin.

0
11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mahmoud930921

Is there a reason why I should guess 'jij' and not 'je'? I seriously cannot distinguish the two unless I listen to it in slo-mo.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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jij sounds close to 'yay!'.

The e in je sounds like the 'e' in the English word differ.

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeverusSnape42

Why is "heb" also in a sentence with "nodig" when there is no word "have"? (Sorry if that's confusing)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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iets nodig hebben= to need something

But I'm not sure whether I got what you were trying to ask.

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sogghartha

It's an auxilliary verb. You could think of it as 'have need' of something.

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Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
rhhpk
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Why is "je" wrong here?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It's not wrong, only if it is a listening exercise you can only use jij here since that is what the lady says.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
rhhpk
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I was asked to translate the English sentence, and was marked wrong for using "je", so I just wondered why that's not acceptable.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It is accepted, perhaps something else was wrong. A common mistake is:

  • hebt je - with inversion of the subject and verb, the verb loses the -t in the case of je/jij, though in that case it could tell you it should be hebt u.

Another thing that sometimes happens is when you make a spelling mistake elsewhere in the sentence it also indicates je as a spelling mistake and tells you it has to be jij instead.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
rhhpk
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Hi - thanks for that explanation. It's useful to know, but I'm pretty sure my translation was:

Hoeveel operaties heb je nodig?

and it flagged up only the "je" as wrong. Perhaps it does that because it's also given as a listening exercise?

At least I know now that it's a duolingo mistake and that both forms are equally possible in this sentence/context. Thanks again

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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If it happens again and you are sure your answer was right male sure you use the report function.

2
2 years ago