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"An bhfanann sé le mo mháthair?"

Translation:Does he stay with my mother?

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/qoppaphi
qoppaphi
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That's a rather personal question, Pól.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obekim

Shouldn't "wait for" be accepted as a translation of "fan le"? ie "Does he wait for my mother?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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I was wondering that too. Then I checked here and its seems to be the case

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/Wait

I reported "wait for" as a valid translation, 20-03-2016

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh.Hogan
Josh.Hogan
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It seems like "mo mháthair" is sometimes pronounced with /v/ sound and sometimes with a /w/ sound. Is this just a dialect thing, or is there something in this sentence that would determine that pronunciation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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mh is /v/ at the beginning of a word in the Munster accent, which this speaker mostly tries to emulate. At the end or in the middle of a word, it combines with the vowels on either side to produce an "oh" sound. Unless preceded by i, as in "raibh", when it's /v/ again.

In the rest of Ireland, it's /v/ when slender, and /w/ when broad.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh.Hogan
Josh.Hogan
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Go raibh maith agat! That makes sense. I've wondered about that a few times.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/envythenight

is this the correct pronunciation of bhfanann? in my head i head i had the rule for 'bhf' as 'w' when followed by a broad vowel and 'v' when followed by a slender...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

In Munster Irish, it's always pronounce /v/. However, I still wouldn't recommend trusting the speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

I find it kind of easier (not necessarily correct) if you just pronounces bh, mh, and bhf, as like a german w (where it makes both a w and a v sound at the same time) since depending on the dialect it is really up for grabs (one says it's always v, another says it's always w, and still another says it's always v, but some times its w) but if you pronounce it like the german w when you're learning then i feel one can easily adjust to which ever "proper" pronunciation easily when you deal with the specific dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
balbhan
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There aren't any dialects that invariably render bh as [w]. All of them render it as [vʲ] before 'e' and 'i'. Connacht and Ulster have [w] before 'a', 'o', and 'u'.

Munster has [v] invariably, but this is often pronounced [β] - like a 'v', but with lips formed for 'b'. This is the sound of the second 'v' in Spanish 'vivir' [biβir].

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

I had learned somewhere that 'bhf' was originally 'vw' but most Irish over time have shortened it to 'w', as in the word 'bhfuil'. In the case of that pronunciation, [vwihl] is now [wihl]. So, this is confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lacebad

Could someone please tell me the difference between fanann and fanacht?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/birgit72635
birgit72635
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Fanann is the finite verb. You can say: Fanann sé - he waits. Fanacht is a verbal noun used for example to say you are waiting - táim ag fanacht - I am waiting

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walgen
walgen
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could you answer this with brionn se do mhathair?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyAnn11

The answer said se was it and not he. I thought you needed seo to be it.

1 year ago