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"Usted sintió eso."

Translation:You felt that.

1
5 years ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jake8008

Why would it give an alternate defintion as 'heard', and not accept it as a correct answer?

42
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calebrankin

Because Duolingo

77
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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my guess is because we already covered hear as "oír"..when I hear or read "sintió" it kind of reminds me of "sense" (I believe a lot of these words have common root words) and to sense something is to 'feel' it (next time I get this one I'll try "sensed").. duo likes to give hints that are poor translations for the situation, it's (like I have seen someone else say before) better treated like a multiple choice on a test it COULD be right.. but it could be wrong, use your judgment for context and past knowledge to double check yourself..

Edit: words in italic, edited gracias a skepticalways nov 29 2015

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Mr smile- In my Spanish dictionnary they also translate sentir by to hear a noise for exemple.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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mitanine56- yes, and on Spanishdict.com it lists it as taste, feel, hear, as well as several others (seems like pretty much anything that boils down to a sense or a feeling be it physical or emotional).

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/sinti%C3%B3

I'm not saying that hear isn't a 'proper translation' or that it shouldn't be accepted, in fact it probably should be so. it probably requires reporting and, if a couple people do flag it, it will probably be accepted, but I was just answering the question of why it would be suggested but flagged as wrong.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JR777300

I think that you are right in that a correct translation would be "Did you sense that?" when it is a noise. So the word heard is not correct per se.... but that you sensed the noise.

Difficult to explain but I am sure that you get my drift!

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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I find that the more I learn another language the more general of a term that "correct translation" really is, I mean, in English you wouldn't say "did you sense that" if you were talking about a sound, that is, unless you are talking about A REALLY BIG sound that caused big enough vibrations that you actually did feel them, in which case you would probably say "did you feel that" otherwise it's just not generally proper English to use "sense" in that way.

I think part of it has to do with slang and the way it leads into linguistic growth because honestly when I am trying to remember a Spanish word for something that I can't think of off the top of my head I start searching my mind for synonyms trying to find what often feels like a more 'sophisticated' word (or sometimes more crude way to say it) that fits the bill and more often than not I find that I do know a Spanish word (if not the word) that works..

perhaps the problem is that people are looking for a direct translation that they can understand in perfect English when what they should be looking for is more of a subtle meaning of the word/phrase and deriving the meaning form there, but you do need a basis of literal translations to start from..

it truly is hard to explain but I do get your drift, the literal translation regardless of context is "did you sense that" but that changes by context to mean "did you feel/hear/see/smell/ect.. that?" although in this particular instance there is no question mark so it's actually a statement of fact "you felt(/ect..) that"..

3
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Mr.Smilie, you seem to have a good learner's attitude, so please don't be offended if I correct your use of "...like I seen someone else say," because many learners of English read our forum, and "saw" would be the correct past tense of "see." "Seen" takes a "helping verb," such as "I have seen someone else say." (Just trying to be helpful, not "snarky.") :-)

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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first off, Thank you for your kind words. secondly, not a problem, in fact, thank you for pointing it out and I'll correct it now so as to prevent future bad habits to English learners. In hindsight I should have added "have" before "seen" and it probably wouldn't have hurt to add "before" to the end of that sentence. as I have said elsewhere on these forums, I find myself learning better English grammar (such as the usage of than Vs. then, among other things.) while learning the Spanish language and it's grammar. Granted, nobody likes to learn they are wrong, but it is often an important step in learning what is right. (=

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyFrican

Just pointing it out, because it's become a point of conversation... Shouldn't "like I have seen someone else say before" be "like I heard someone else say before"?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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I just re-read the posts and I believe that in this context "like I have seen someone else say before" could have been "like I have seen someone else express before" or "like I have seen someone else type before" both would probably be suitable (although don't have the same linguistic flow in my opinion.) because I was actually referring to text that I had seen and not actually heard per-say. I don't believe "heard" is the word I will choose to use here, because while it might be grammatically proper in the sentence, and many people would probably prefer to use it, it fails to express the fact that it was a visual relay of information, at least in my opinion, so I think I'll leave the post as it has been for the last year and a half. also, as an after thought, you can certainly have seen someone speak, "did you see the presidential speech on Saturday?" is a perfectly acceptable sentence, although you may still get an answer like "yes, but the crowd was so loud that I couldn't hear a word that he said."

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gianniangel1

I can't figure that either. 'Heard' is also correct. I flagged it as 'should be accepted'.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nayeli713189

Exactly! I put the same thing! And it said i was wrong

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

you felt that?

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winmode

Near fault lines there are many many small earthquakes. I have been asked lots of times, Did you feel that?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
itastudent
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¿¿¿Por qué 'You heard that' no es correcto???

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

To hear is "oír"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenbajr
greenbajr
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also ""you smelled that.""

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/max.a.wang
max.a.wang
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Porque dice "you felt that"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaguarWhisperer

same

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Why doesn't this sentence use the reflective pronoun?

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spieskim
spieskim
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I suggest you think of "Me senti bien." as an instance, however, "I felt good" doesn't need an object in English (as a result of that "feel" is a sense verb.) Yet Spanish DOES need an object, so they put 'myself' as a reflective object. But in this case, 'eso' is the direct object so no need to use 'myself' as a reflective.

10
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Thank you, spieskim. That's interesting; I didn't know that!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gillpinnin

Thank you for that, I did not know

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

I had the same question.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kayllama

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janwiltzen

why can't it mean ' you regretted that"?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amywtlin
amywtlin
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can't it be "you sensed that?"

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandallMiles
RandallMiles
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In "El Diccionario Oxford," the Spanish-English dictionary I use, under the English word "sense" they give two choices: "sentir" and "notar." "You sensed that" should be accepted.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaryCagle1

Sensed ?! Feels ok to me...

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyGardner17

The verb is "senter", and you change the er to ió for past tense, right? So why is there an I instead of an E after the S? Why did that spelling change?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Me too, I am surprised and don't understand why, if the verb is "sentir", it changes into sintio', the second letter should be "e" as well...?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenbajr
greenbajr
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Verbs in the past tense often have altered stems. English is often likewise. Consider come to came, is to was, sit to sat.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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A number of verbs are stem-changing verbs. They change the stem vowel in a number of places. "Sentir" changes in the present tense (except the nosotros/vosotros forms) e --> ie, so "I'm sorry" is "Lo siento." It also changes in the 3rd person sing. and pl. of the preterite, e --> i. So "I felt" is "Sentí," but "He felt" is "Sintió." Look up more info about stem-changing verbs, also called "boot verbs" or "shoe verbs." (They'll explain why.) :-)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MHarnish

ditto

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tashas

Thank you, Babella

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You are welcome!

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Hi Babella, I tell everyone you are my spanish buddy. Quick question- I have not bothered to learn the vosotros conjugations in Duolingo because it is not used. Am I going to regret later that I did not learn these, if I only plan to use my Spanish locally and in Latin America?

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Hello, rmcgwn :] Hahaha, that is cool!

In my opinion, there is no need to learn the "tú/vosotros" form. You did not specify in which Latin American country would you use it, but some use the "vos" form and it is not necessary to learn it either. It is just a different way to speak, we understand each other well no matter if one says "usted canta", "tú cantas" o "vos cantás" ({- all of them mean "you sing"). Even if you decided to come to Spain, you would have no problem (most foreigners speak latin American Spanish (aka Mexican XD) anyway), so it is your choice ;]

10
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/unicyclegrant

Terremotos en Chile

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tashas

why is "you, usted" and "he/she/it, sintió" formats used together here? Should it not be sentiste or sentisteis?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

The "usted" form is the same as the third person (he/she/it): usted sintió, él sintió. The "tú" form is "sentiste" indeed, but "sentísteis" is the "vosotros" (2nd person plural, informal) form ;]

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenbajr
greenbajr
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English also uses the third person to express respect, as in "Would the lady like some coffee?" spoken by a waiter to the lady. "You" would be too familiar.

It (Usted) should be capitalized, however.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

My impression is that 'sintió refers to feel, feeling, felt. I see suggestions are- "heard" (escuchado) and "smelled" (olió). Native speakers please comment.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

A form of the verb sentir is also used in the expresion "lo siento", which is used similarly to English's "I'm sorry."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnowSune

This sentence sounds a little strange to me (the translation I mean)... When would you use it?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tstomg

Why is it "you" instead of "he/she" felt that?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfisher534

It was a ghoooooooooost

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelVered

Thats what she said

0
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jose_Romildo

I do not agree.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jose_Romildo

With exception to modal verbs, I think I can use "did" when I want to make a question, though I accept: "you felt that?" as well. Thank you.

0
Reply2 years ago