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"Tá sé chun é a bhailiú."

Translation:He is going to collect it.

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

what the differnce between 'chun' and 'ag dul'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

How the structure is set up. If you use chun or ar tí you follow with the infinitive structure. The ag dul ag structure, you use the VN.

Tá mé chun é a bhailiú but Tá mé ag dul á bhailiú

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

just on a different question, i am still finding it hard to know the difference between é a bhailiú and á bhailiú . don't they both mean hitting it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

don't they both mean hitting it

That'd be á b(h)ualadh. Bailiú is the VN of bailigh, collect.

The difference is best thought of as the difference between the English infinitive (to collect) and the English present progressive (collecting).

Generally, to form the infinitive in Irish, you just use the VN. However, if it has a direct object, you front the object, and a and lenite.

  • bailiú (to collect)

  • é a bhailiú (to collect it/him)

The other is the present progressive, which is formed with ag and the verbal noun (though in native speech the g is not pronounced before a consonant).

  • ag bailiú (collecting)

However, you can't have a pronoun following a progressive structure, since all nouns following it must be in the genitive. So what you do is you change ag to do (though it remains ag in Munster), add the correct possessive pronoun after it, then mutate the VN accordingly. Note that do a because á (pronounced dhá in some dialects) and that do ár is dár.

  • do mo bhailiú (collecting me)
  • do do bhailiú (collecting you)
  • á bhailiú (collecting him/masculine it)
  • á bailiú (collecting her/feminine it)
  • dár mbailiú (collecting us)
  • do bhur mbailiú (collecting y'all)
  • á mbailiú (collecting them)

However, in the example above, they have roughly the same meaning (see ALDB below), but they're formed using different structures.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

thanks sooo much! I am on my last 5 skills of the tree and thats largely because of your help!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

Meaning wise nothing. Chun tends to be used in Munster instead of "ag dul", but the meaning is still the same. galaxyrocker has the grammar.

chun dul = ready to go

ar tí dul = about to go

3 years ago

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I put in "He is ready to collect it." and got marked wrong. I was going by what I saw here: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/verbnom1.htm#le Is it right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The description on GnaG is correct, but it isn't relevant to this particular sentence.

"chun + verbal noun", (chun péinteáil or chun iascaigh or chun tarlú) implies readiness to start the action described in the verb. But in this sentence, it's tá sé chun é a bhailiú - it's just a straightforward directional/intentional chuig.

2 years ago

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Ahhhh, I see now. Go raibh míle maith agat. c:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saucysalmon55

Could you say "he is about to collect it" since "chun" implies "readiness" as mentioned in GnaG? I was marked wrong when I tried it anyway.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

"about to" implies that something will happen in the very near future, not just readiness. You wouldn't use chun to say that.

Tá sé ar tí é a bhailiú - "he is about to collect it".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saucysalmon55

Thank you kindly!

1 year ago