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"A pesar del otro."

Translation:In spite of the other one.

5 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Okay, I have the answer everyone has been asking for, and thanks all for asking because this is really interesting.

Once upon a time (about 200 years ago), pesar was a noun that meant sorrow, or penalty. Since the 18th century, pesar has been losing its noun sense, and becoming a connective, but before that happened this a pesar de idiom ossified into the language as a way of saying "to the sorrow of". Since then the word pesar has entirely lost this meaning of pain and sorrow to words like pena, but this phrase has lived on, unchanged.

Source

Basically, this origin is exactly like that of "despite", whose root sense is "to the spite of".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebotica

and I thought we were learning pronouns.! Not vague colloquialisms. Couoln`t even find this in the Collins Spanish dictionary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary
  • Otro is a pronoun.

  • A pesar de is a common prepositional phrase that you need to know and, like you said, is hardly intuitive at face value.

  • The drop down hint tells you what it means.

  • A pesar de otro uses a phrase you need to know combined with a pronoun.

Thus, your objection is invalid.

:)

Edit: use Spanishdict.com

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

I went with "To weigh the other" and I guess it is an idiom.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"pesar" does indeed = weigh, but

"a pesar de" is a prepositional phrase meaning "in spite of.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patschge

why is "despite of the other" wrong? what´s the difference between "in spite of" and "despite of"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luvlearning

The additional "of" doesn't work with despite. I wrote "Despite the other." and it was correct. It's almost like that sentence has "of" twice because it's implied in the Word "despite" with "de" and then adding "of" again is the issue I believe. If that makes any sense at all to you. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patschge

thanks for your helpful answer!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaMil981126

"Despite the other." Despite of the other is wrong in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichelleP3
MichelleP3
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Welp, I'm not entirely surprised I'm bad at my native language. Haha.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

"A pesar de" meaning "in spite of" is in my Merriam-Webster Latin American Spanish-English dictionary 2003 edition.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Wouldn't it have been more helpful, if Duo introduced this in a sentence instead of in a fragment?! Saludos, Susanna

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Estoy de acuerdo contigo, Talca. ¡Saludos!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Doesn't pesar usually mean remove? How does it transform into in spite of?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zeunysos

As best as I can tell, "pesar" is a noun here, meaning regret or sorrow. (I'm guessing it comes from a metaphorical application of the verb "pesar", "to weigh" -- i.e., weighed down with regret.)

So "a pesar de [algo]" is literally "in regret of [something]", although in English it might be more natural to say "with regrets to [someone]". We typically only use that phrase when referring to persons, but if you think about how you'd convey a similar caveat in reference to a thing or an idea, "despite" or "in spite of" are about as close as it gets.

The other version I've seen on DL is "a pesar de todo". Read it as "with regrets to everything", or "in spite of everything", and you can see how that phrase comes to mean "nevertheless" or "regardless".

Hope that helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"A pesar de" is an expression. Many expressions use pesar, with a variety of meanings.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

You may be thinking of quitar? Pesar usually means to weigh something, although It's probably used in other ways.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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It seems like a stretch to put this in the Pronoun section. I assume the computer picked up "otro". Wouldn\t this kind of be an idiom? DL needs a tree branch for Idioms! Accepted: Despite the other

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Talca: I'm new at this, as you know. I looked up "pesar"= to weigh. I'm still trying to figure out when to use an "a". So I'm figuring OK, What are we weighing? Then I looked and the rest of the sentence is "of/the other"So the best I could come up with is "To weigh the other" It may be a meaningless to you but I use this discussion area to learn. You've helped me in the past. You would normally explain to me why it is meaningless. We all have bad days...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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This seems like an idiomatic use of the verb pesar (to weigh)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Talca; Thanks for the help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ann2312

This one threw me so I put to weigh in the balance - does anyone know how the Spanish would look. Would someone kindly tell me how to access drop down hints. Many thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MJMGruver
MJMGruver
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To access drop down hints you mouse over the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EsraaMAbuE

Although other

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChadwickEa

Why not "To despite the other." would not work.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnrichardevans

bit of an odd one to throw in innit

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raydpratt

I looked at the hint of 'despite,' etc., and I tasted the flavor of the whole phrase of 'a pesar del otro,' and I just could not get the right flavor in English, but I tried "despite the contrary," which is a common argumentative phrase in higher English (e.g., in legal arguments), but it was rightly marked wrong since even I myself had no real faith in the translation. Can anyone else bring out the real flavor of this phrase in English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BuffyMartin

I think in English we would say "On the other hand" to convey this idea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ForteStrength

^ This

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMarriott0

Many of the comments left on Duolingo neglect the simple fact that for an English speaker Spanish is a FOREIGN language.To expect literal translations all the time is a form of cultural imperialism.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

I thought pesar meant to weigh. Where did I go wrong?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob43066

"notwithstanding the other" was not accepted although collins gives "a pesar de" as one of its translations. DL likes to rigidly stick to just one or two translations, it seems.

2 years ago