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"Por favor, ven a mi fiesta de cumpleaños."

Translation:Please, come to my birthday party.

5 years ago

125 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/khaakenajaf

how is this possible they have not started the imperatives yet.and now suddenly they introduce ven as come.i know imperatives but still we are here learning gradually

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louisng114

pre-exposion. I tapped on the word for translation. The next chapter will be easier.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boseous

*pre-exposure

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oskalingo
oskalingo
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Or pre-exposition.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
Druckles
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Probably not pre-explosion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindsayHopewell

Damn, nice streak!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindhMani
ArvindhMani
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DuoSpanish is cool this way. It's lacking in DuoDeutsch though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
Druckles
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The German tree is a lot better than the Spanish tree.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BettyBuehl

I almost typed please come to my party from birthday party :p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vishal556497

Me too but "of birthday party" instead of "from" ;p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cardano
Cardano
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I agree; the imperative lesson over 40 lessons down the road.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

So, I shouldn't feel bad about thinking this was "come to my party".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Not sure if it's intentional or not, but it seems that there's question in each bunch that has something that doesn't exactly fit the lesson. Usually from a previous lesson, but occasionally from a future lesson.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenmachine19

Should "go" as well as "come" be correct? "Please, go to my birthday party."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thewolfgirl7

No. Van means go, and ven means come.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bigjacob2006

It says "de" up next so I dont know about that it is wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennifermcmu

I thought "ven" was "you/they see." Wouldn't one use "vienen" for "you/they come?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

'ven' is an imperative or command form of 'venir,' to come. It is used because this is a request.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjcm94

In this they say "fiesta de cumpleaños", would it make sense to say "cumpleaños fiesta"? And Is there a rule to know why or when to flip a sentence the opposite of how it would be phrased in English, like here is Is "party of birthday" buy in English we sat the opposite? Thanks in advance.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Yes, there is a rule. In Spanish you can't have a noun modifying another noun as you can in English. The main noun is separated from its modifier by "de." So, business plan becomes "plano de negocios," school schedule is "horario de escuela," kitchen door is "puerta de cocina," and, of course, birthday party is "fiesta de cumpleaños.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mriksman

I understand that this means 'come to' as an imperative, but I was thinking - what if you actually wanted to say "They see to my birthday party". As in, they are organising/looking after the birthday party. How does that translate?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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"See to" is a bit of an idiomatic expression in English, my guess is that it doesn't mean the same thing (or even make sense) when translated literally into Spanish.

I'm sure there are more elegant ways to express the same thing, for instance "cuidan" = "they look after/take care of" (though I have no idea if that would be suitable here).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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I agree with malkeynz that you can't translate 'see to' into Spanish in any literal way. But 'cuidan' sounds very odd to me in this context. In Peninsular Spanish, you're most likely to express this this way: "Ellos se encargan de mi fiesta"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
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I thought ven was they see but it did not make sense.I am confused sometimes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

ven can be either; you are correct

you can enter ver and then venir here:

http://www.conjugation.org/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TymurT
TymurT
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Wow, I got everything correct exept I didn't put the word "party"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Talk about learning the hard way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Always best way. Sinks in solid. Grabs you by the tail and whams your head into the concrete.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpanishWhiz

how true

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ttbaby9
ttbaby9
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I love your comments! Once you commented to keep practicing and to repeat the lesson until you get it 100% Thanks so much for your encouragement! It helped me to better myself here and continue on with my day streak even if my skills in present tense verbs were lacking. Arigatou!/Gracias/Thank you so much!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You are on the Path!

Way to go!

The ONLY way to become anywhere near fluent in Spanish is by becoming utterly familiar with the language. And one can only become familiar with Spanish through mass exposure and not by trying to just memorize stuff. You can memorize something one day and forget it the next. That is so easy to do. One's brain makes for a very poor hard drive. It's a big mistake to expect it to work like one.

When a lesson starts to become boring that's a good clue you doing well. You can pat yourself on the back at that point while in the next lesson you can expect to feel really stupid and even a bit discouraged.

When ever one takes on the challenge of facing something altogether new it always feels like staring into a Black Hole. It's aweful! No fun at all. Duo tries to compensate for this liability with its often off beat sentenses. I love 'em! Often those are the ones you can see someone comment on by saying, “I'd never say that!"

One thing to ever keep in mind is that Duolingo does not teach translation. The study of translation at a university is only for expert users of Spanish, which we are far from being. The English sentences and phrases Duoling provides us with are only meant to help us to understand what the shown Spanish sentences and phrases MEAN where Duolingo uses the simplest English as can be done while applying just a couple of examples. No other English translations are needed to understand what the Spanish sentenses and phrases MEAN. Nevertheless, there are Comment threads filled with alternate ways to say something in English such as how it is done in somebody's own neck of the woods, their neighborhood, or simply how someone prefers to say something in English. It is all meant to be helpful but the commenters have no actual idea as to what Duolingo is trying to teach us. And what Duolingo is striving to teach us is what Spanish sentences and phrases MEAN, and that is all.

After one gets through the tree and feels confident enough to dare apply what one has learned on a trip to, say, Mexico, of what use will then be all those Comment threads fill with alternate ways to say something in English? It is a waste of time and brain power to even read that stuff however amusing it all might be.

When I go into a Comment thread I generally do so to gain a better understanding about the Spanish sentence the Comment thread pertains to and all too often I find it filled with bibble babble about different ways to say something in English. What a waste of good brain power! It's sad.

I talk about this situation as I from time to time do to help new students from falling into the trap of thinking alternate ways to say something in English beyond the simple English sentences Duolingo provides is of any importance. And I also do it to help stop the Comment threads from becoming filled with bibble babble.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

By the way ttbaby9, way back when I made the recommedation you saw to work each lesson until one scored 100% before moving on to the next lesson I was doing each lesson until I scored 100% three times. I considered advising doing that but realized how that would powerfully put people off, so didn't even hit that scoring 100% three times was the best way to go.

I had found that after I scored a 100% accuracy my chances of scoring 100% again was not great which meant I still did not know the lesson well enough yet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerifue

Does "ven" mean "see" or "come" or both? I mean, is it a single verb covering the meaning of both, or two separate verbs having a matching conjugate form?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Both. It's the third person plural (ellos, ellas, Uds.) present tense of ver ("to see") and the familiar () imperative (command) of venir ("to come"). In this sentence, the a and the context tell us it's venir.

http://www.conjugation.org/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borismrodriguez

It's just coincidental. The two meanings of "ven" come from two separate places. 1) For the verb "ver" (to see), "ven" is the present tense conjugation for ellos/ellas/ustedes. 2) For the verb "venir" (to come), "ven" is the command/request form for tú.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hazza1995

ven is 'to see' isnt it? ve = he sees, ves = you see etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafoxe

"Ver" is "to see." "Ven" is "they see" or the command form of venir - to come. In this sentence, "ven" obviously means "come."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertL
RobertL
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Not that obviously. Imagine someone showing a photo of that party.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

robert- but we know it's imperative because of Please

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

please see rspreng's comment elsewhere in this discussion

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZumaniMonet

I thought venga for venir is used instead of ven as a request.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

ven is for the familiar "you" and venga is for the formal "you"

when you enter a verb here (link below), it shows you the imperatives along with the other conjugations, which is especially helpful for the irregulars:

http://www.conjugation.org/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZumaniMonet

thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoukiMunster

Great link! very useful! Muchas gracias!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoacademy

it sounded like the lady said "ben" instead of "ven".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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That is correct. When the 'v' is at the start of a word, it is always pronounced identical to a 'b'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoacademy

thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duonks
duonks
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'b' and 'v' are both pronounced the same: /b/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

duolingo- because in Spanish, the sound V doesn't really exist,

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryan.levy.

When she says Ben Im supposed to write Ven

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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Correct. When the 'v' is at the start of a Spanish word, it is pronounced identical to the 'b'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duonks
duonks
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In theory there is no 'v' sound in Spanish (at least in Spain), so you won't always hear a clear difference in pronunciation... You'll just have to learn when to spell the 'b' sound as in "votar" or "botar" for example, which have different meanings. If you do get it wrong, people will probably mention the phrase "con 'b' de burro" :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmostLizbian
AlmostLizbian
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Sooo, I'm guessing "Please come to my birthday party, I have no other friends" wasn't the correct answer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiveMeAndy

Just for fun, I tried "Please, come to the party of my birthday" and got it wrong. I knew the correct answer was "Please, come to my birthday party," but could someone please explain why the syntax doesn't work here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

It might if you got the possessive's sorted out.

It's "mi fiesta de cumpleaños", so "MY party of birthday" not "THE party of MY birthday"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiveMeAndy

Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

No, GiveMeAndy. In Spanish a noun can't modify another noun as it does in English. So, since both "fiesta" and "cumpleaños" are nouns, you need the "de" in order to come out with the correct translation of "birthday party." See my earlier comment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valdemarvascaino
valdemarvascaino
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14.12.2013

Translation:"Please, come to my birthday party."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oriettuzza

Non è errore mettere please in fondo alla frase!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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No, non è errore. È perfettamente accettabile e corretto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpeterle

so ven is the command form of Ver?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

No. "Ven" is the 2nd person (tú) command (imperative) form of "venir" (to come). See this link - scroll down for the Imperative: http://www.123teachme.com/spanish_verb_conjugation/venir

What is confusing is that "ven" is also the 3rd person present tense plural for "ver," (they see or you formal see). Type "ver" into the page above to see its conjugation. But since Duo's sentence starts with "por favor" and "they/you see" doesn't make sense here, the sentence must be in the command form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

I took an audio course before discovering Duolingo. Mostly, it's good...but...

I learnt "venga" for "come", but can't find any reference to "venga" anywhere.

Is "Venga a mi fiesta." wrong? Different than "ven a mi fiesta"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

It's not wrong. "Venga" is the conjugation of the second person, but in a formal way (usted). "Ven tú", "venga usted". Are you clear?

So, "venga/ven a mi fiesta" is almost the same. The difference is "venga" is for "usted", as the same as you, but formal, or when there isn't confidence.

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Heh. Thanks for the clarification. (I'm actually up-to-speed on this, now....notice I posted that 6 months ago!)

Jeje. Gracias por ayudarme. (A propósito, escribí ese hace seis meses.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

Yes, I noticed it was time ago. I thought, maybe he hasn't found the right response, but if he found it, perhaps it can be useful for others.

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

does it still work if you write "please come to my birthday party" instead of "please, come to my birthday party?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DLPerez28

does ver mean "to see" or "to come?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Ver is "to see".

Ven is both. Just like in English, there are words that mean more than one thing.

Ven is the Imperative 2nd person familiar singular conjugation of "venir". When you make an order, "You! Come!" (Tú ven!)

Ven is then Indictive 3rd person plural conjugation of "ver". When you make the observation, "Ya'all see. They see. They see." (Usted ven. Ellos ven. Ellas ven.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DLPerez28

Thanks! Helps a lot.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian690828

Americans frequently drop the party from this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

"Americans" from where?... Canada? Mexico? Panama? Colombia? Peru?

Greetings

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle332121

Since the imperative version of the verb venir is being used here, would it still be okay to put "you" in the sentence? I put "please, YOU come to my birthday party." I know how English has you understood (as to make adding "you" redundant in imperative comments/ sentences), but does the same necessarily go for Spanish? I thought it was optional.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

As well in English it's no necessary, in Spanish it's not necesary either.

Moreover, if you write in English "please, you come to my birthday party", the meaning change... it woulb be "por favor, tu vienes a mi fiesta de cumpleaños". It changes from imperative to present simple. In Spanish that doesn't happen if you add "tú". The semantics doesn't change, therefore, it would be "por favor, tú, ven a mi fiesta de cumpleaños". But I said, "tú" isn't necessary, too it's redundant.

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JusticePar

I have a question is " for favor " be a correct translation for por favor?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

No, "for favor" doesn't exist. For "por favor", the only right translation is "please".

There is a convitantion "in favor", but it means "a favor".

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

I disagree with hacho_haller. Sure, "por favor" translates to "please", but it literally means "as (a) favor", which is virtually identical in meaning to the word "please".

Whether DuoLingo accepts it or not....dunno.

[First language English. Aprendo español.]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nacho_haller

But "for favor" isn't a right translation of "please" ("por favor"), and that is the JusticePar's question.

Greetings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevenElcarim

when to use ven / vienes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

"Ven" is the familiar second person singular imperative.

Use it when you're "demanding" (imperative) a friend (tú) to come. (In English, we typically drop the subject to get the same effect: Clean your room. Come to my party. Eat your dinner at 5.)

"Vienes" is the familiar second person singular indicative.

Use it when you're describing (indicative) the situation. (You clean your room. You come to my party. You eat your dinner at 5.)

As a question:

"Ven" is more or less "You WILL come, won't you?" (I really want you there.)

"Vienes" is like "Are you coming?" (Don't care so much, either way....just want to know.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simonlang

I put "Please, come to my party for my birthday" which I thought would have been fine? It seems like a literal translation but it's still fairly valid English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

My party for my birthday is terrible sounding English, unless you're asking them to come to your party and the birthday gift are asking for is their attendance. It isn't really polite to ask for presents though, and it sounds awkward regardless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BornSinner1

Why ven is used here instead of venir?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Venir is the infinitive form of the verb. Ven is conjugated. Why is ven..., not why ven is...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borismrodriguez

"venir" (to come) is the infinitive form. You can't use the infinitive in this case because it's like saying: "Please, to come to my birthday party". It makes no sense. Instead, you must conjugate the verb. In this case, "ven" is the command/request form you must use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucaso777

So now they drop an alternate translation of 'ven' in without even telling us what the alternate translation means? Wierd. I want my lingot back.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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They told us things before they give them to us?! Wow, I must have missed that!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

What? Is your time warp machine on the fritz?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
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I am having a problem with this and that.I just can't get it right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
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Sometimes I wonder if the folks know English as well as I do some translations we do not speak like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Report it; it will be corrected, eventually :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grinchforest
Grinchforest
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Why please can not be at the end of sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Why can please not... or why can't please... Why please can not doesn't make much sense, although it's close enough to know what you meant.

Please can be at the end, but that's not how they phrased it. You can do either in Spanish, although please first is more polite. You are asking somebody to do something, so you let them know from the very beginning that you are politely requesting instead of giving a command. But it is flexible and go on the end. In English, please can be first (although rare), in between “Will you please come..." or at the end. I'm not clear on which language you were actually asking about.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grinchforest
Grinchforest
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In translation from Spanish to English duolingo didn't accept answer with please at the end of sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

I'm still not clear on what you're asking. You couldn't put it on the end in English? As I already stated, it is considered more proper to say "please" at the beginning than elsewhere. This is true more in Spanish than in English, but true all around. English speakers will put it several places in the sentence, whereas Spanish speakers will tend to be more set on having it first. It is always most polite to use "Please" first. If you move its position, it can sometimes mean you are only using the word as a formality to avoid being labeled "bossy" and not necessarily because you are acknowledging that you are politely requesting (not demanding). It can be moved around, but a lot of times it comes across differently if you say "please" first than if you attach it to the end.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Good answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhitePat

With "please" beginning the sentence, it does not sound like an imperative to me. I thought imperatives were more like demands. Are all polite requests considered imperatives?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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The grammatical term "imperative" has little to do with the connotations that the everyday term has. Imperative statements can be polite, as in the case of this sentence, "Please, come to my party!".

No, not all polite requests are considered imperatives. If it is in the form of a question, it is no longer grammatically an imperative: "Will you come to my party?" is an example thereof.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adestruction

Hey how come duo uses de b4 cumpleaños

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/palocortado
palocortado
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"de cumpleaños" describes what kind of a 'fiesta' it is. -Ven a mi fiesta? -Qué tipo de fiesta es? -Es mi fiesta de cumpleaños.

Hope this helps. Any questions, ask away :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Pretty sure we haven't covered 'to come' yet. Just as well I know venir from French, and guessed that fiesta probably means party.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dleehii

I love Duolingo but sometimes they throw things at me I haven't learned yet. I've yet to learn how to request something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theFIZZYnator

El año pasado, ningún vino :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguio7

fiesta de cumpleaños translates to "party of my birthday party"? the last time i saw here cumpleaños meant birthday party. so it seems a bit uncanny to me... can anyone explain?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dleehii

Cumpleaños just means birthday, not birthday party.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mws1225
mws1225
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Why is it "ven" and not "viene" here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mriksman

Ven is being used in the imperative form. This form is not just for commands, but can also be used for speech acts whose function is essentially not to make an order or request, but to give an invitation, give permission, express a wish, make an apology, etc.:

Come to the party tomorrow! (invitation) Eat the apple if you want. (permission) Have a nice trip! (wish)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BirdieWolf

Talk about setting one up to fail.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBrownRN

Happy Birthday!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannahelaine14

why couldn't you just say, por favor, ven a mi cumpleaños?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasminelac

I just discovered the verb is Ver (to see) and I thought it was Ir (to go). It's the indicative mode, ven (ustedes) as in "see you all" (thanks Dleehii)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/super_dragon

Why not ve instead of ven? because ven sounds to me like a plural of you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolynCh
CarolynCh
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This question didn't give me enough time to finish speaking the sentence before checking on all three occasions. Can this be fixed please?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Requesting for something like that here won't do you any good, Carolyn; use the Report-a-Problem button.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rontoro

i did: Please, come to my birthday how could this be wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindhMani
ArvindhMani
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There's a grammatical error in what you said. "Birthday" is not an event, so you cannot use the preposition to here; use for instead.

If the sentence had been referring to a "birthday party" instead, you would have been correct:

<pre> Please come to my birthday party </pre>

is the way you would say that. In fact,

<pre> Please come for my birthday party </pre>

also sounds alright to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YashVijayv

Can anybody help me understand why 'de' was used in '...mi fiesta de cumpleaños.' Also please exlplain me how to use 'de' and 'del' . Thanks in advance guys!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

In Spanish, a noun cannot modify another noun as it can in English. So "birthday (noun) party (noun) becomes, "fiesta DE cumpleaños" (literally party of birthday). Also see my previous comment above. "Del" is a contraction of the "de" and the masculine article "el."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coolcats4

this one is unfair - we haven't taken 'ven' or 'cumpleanos' yet!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robofam

I thought venga was the imperative "come".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Venga" is the 1st and 3rd person singular Subjunctive and also the 3rd person singular Imperative (he/she/it comes or you formal come) of "venir." See: http://www.123teachme.com/spanish_verb_conjugation/venir

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingTrio

Hmm, as a native speaker, I would say there's a difference between "please, come to my birthday party", and "please come to be birthday party". I can't quite describe it though..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

The comma after por favor is not needed in English. Is this a difference between Spanish and English or a quirk in DL? I've also noticed a lot of exercises where two sentences in English are separated by a comma. Does Spanish allow for this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
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I do not think it matters if you use a comma after please.You can pause if you want to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robwith1
Robwith1
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I think DL is helping us to read and understand Spanish. If you want to be perfect you should try to live in a Spanish country. Sometimes when I see the English translation I say to myself, We do not speak English like that. We must understand, and we are not paying anything. Happy learning.

2 years ago