"Jeg glæder mig til aftensmaden."

Translation:I am looking forward to the dinner.

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/stinner18
stinner18
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Is the "mig" necessary in this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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at glæde nogen means to make someone happy, and always takes an object. When it is used as a reflexive verb (glæde sig), it means "to look forward to something".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goldquiver

I have a couple Danish friends, and they seem to use it in a few places. I can't really understand why it shows up though. A common phrase seems to be "(that) I can imagine", which they type as "det kan jeg forestille mig".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/londoncallling

I think some verbs are just reflexive and you just have to learn them like that without worrying about why! I suppose 'det kan jeg forestille mig' literally could be 'I can put it in front of myself', so maybe that tells us something about how Danish people conceptualise imagination: as an image they look at?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Well… in German, it’s also „das kann ich mir vorstellen“ (that can I me in-front-put), but I doubt anybody thinks twice about the literal meaning of putting something in front (or “presenting, introducing”, which can also be a translation of “vorstellen”: you put someone new in front of your friend when you introduce them or you put a topic in front of the audience when you present it).

Native speakers just treat it as a single unit, I think: “sich vorstellen” = to imagine.

Similarly with “ich erinnere mich an…” which literally means “I remind myself of …” but I don’t think any native speaker of German actually makes the connection in their minds; it’s a lexicalised construction meaning “I remember …”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael880308
Michael880308
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If you spend time looking at etymology and cognates I think this could just about be written "I gladden myself for dinner".

Obviously it's tortured English, but it might help to remember it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silvia60275

German "ich freue mich auf..." I guess?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You guess very right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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On another issue, dinner tonight at home would never be 'the dinner', which to me sounds like a fancy celebratory meal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samuel605645
samuel605645
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Excited isn't valid?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Excited" is a bit strong for glæde. It's more of a "looking forward", or, to involve the English cognate, "being glad that it will happen".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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My daughter used to 'glæde sig til' all sorts of things. Julen, sommerferie, et besøg...

2 years ago
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