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  5. "The uncle lives in the count…

"The uncle lives in the country."

Translation:Onklen bor i landet.

November 17, 2014

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daddyyak

This sentence is ambiguous: '...in the country' could mean either in a rural area ("paa landet") or in a specific nation ("i landet").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hitomivin

Jeg synes også, det skal være "på landet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zverlibre

5 years later and it still marks "på landet" wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmpetersen

I also agree. Especially since, at least in the US, "he lives in the country" is always going to be interpreted as a general rural area. If you want to refer to a nation you'd either name that country or use a more specific article, such as "he lives in this country" or "he lives in your country".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariel621292

When Israelis refer to Israel in Hebrew say usually say 'The country',. הארץ. I don't know if it's something unique to Israel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasHrupJ

Why it called "i landet" it schould be "på landet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imcturk1

It should be "Onklen bor på landet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarenSohnM

It can be both. I often refer to denmark as the country, but i would agree this could be confusing to new learners. I landet = in the country (denmark) På landet = in the country (rural area)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gilvribeiro

What's the difference between 'bor' and 'leve'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tddk

"bor" = where you live. "leve"= being alive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ozwordnerd

I agree. He lives in the country. (rural)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yosjp
  • 1161

Siger man ikke altid "ude på landet"? Lige som "ude i badeværelset"???

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