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  5. "Tá faoin gcailín snámh linn …

" faoin gcailín snámh linn inniu."

Translation:The girl intends to swim with us today.

November 17, 2014

19 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annaannaannaan

Does faoin = faoi + an?

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Yes it does

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

That's why cailín has been eclipsed! Without 'an' (only faoi), there wouldn't be any eclipsis.

October 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwasson

"snámh linn"? Tricky, tricky.

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radoslaw182

What's the difference between going to and intend to do something? Is going to more decided than intend to?

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Multi0Lingual4

Yes.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sp1jk3z

"the girl wants to swim with us today" not accepted.

Granted to want and to intend can mean different things but in this context are they equivalent? Just so I know, thanks

November 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory743155

She might want to go but is not allowed to, so although she still wants to go she will probably stay at home on the day.

But, if she intends to go, even though she isn't allowed to join them she will probably work out a way to do so.

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Interesting. So you say "intend to" is more like "determined to"? I would rather have made the following distinction: "I want" is somewhat more emotional. It is my desire, it is important to me. "I intend to" considers the possibility that i won't be able to do what I intend to do. That being said I am not a native English speaker so my interpretation may be misled by the usual literal translations in my mother tongue.

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CakeDatabase

I'd think of it more as "planning to". I intend to go to work, or to make a phone call, though I may not want to do either. To be determined to do something implies to me not just that someone is planning on doing something, but because they feel strongly about wanting to do it as well.

Were someone to tell me they "intended to go to a certain event", I'd interpret that as meaning they were planning on doing it, but something might come up and they might be forced to not go. If they instead said they "were determined to go to a certain event" then I'd take that as they were planning on doing it come hell or high water, and if something came up they'd go anyways.

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quantum07

What does this mean literally?

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S._Harriet

"It is about the girl to swim with us today."

June 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DymphnaLon

I can't find the construction ta faoi for intention in O Donaill or De Bhaldraithe. Ta se ar intinn is what I am used to

April 28, 2017

[deactivated user]

    If you look up faoi in Ó Dónaill and scroll down to 3 (d) you'll find it. Ar intinn is common also as you say.

    April 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DymphnaLon

    I see it now. Thanks. By the time I finished that exercise I quite liked the construction. I might just give away 'ar intinn'.

    April 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cornelius586475

    Needs to be more clarity in the voice of the presenter. It may be the way people generally speak, but, not the best annunciation for learners or indeed for anyone wishing to hear and enjoy good speech.

    December 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneeLozan1

    I agree. Sometimes, I have to listen to a phrase 3 times to really hear what she says. Also, wouldn't planning to...be an acceptable translation?

    July 17, 2019
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