Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Jag äter ett äpple."

Translation:I eat an apple.

0
3 years ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GrandApple
GrandApple
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Jag is pronounced like yoh?

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amphibian
Amphibian
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2

Sounds more like yaw

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Luna_
Isaac_Luna_
  • 20
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 344

I'd say it sounds sort of like yoah, somewhere between your and Amphibian's answer

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGandalf
TheGandalf
  • 24
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

A British "your", I assume?

EDIT: Nevermind. I thought you were saying "jag" is pronounced sort of like "your".

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cHello24

Jag should be pronounced with a Y sound and a long a..Yawgh

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noemilynn

Actually is said yag but in dialect is ya

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonEnMiljon
JonEnMiljon
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

Not only in dialects, actually. It's standard spoken Swedish to drop the 'g'. To natives it sounds archaic or forced if you pronounce it the way it's written. The pronunciation of 'jag' and 'ja' ('yes') are the same :)

1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mewall21

Its a challenge for me to pronounce all the 't's in this sentence like the audio does.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babysbreath8

so jag sounds yah or yaw or yo? im korean and i think it sounds like mostly yah and somethimes yag(in eng sounds)

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

It's a long A-sound rather than an O-sound, but the Swedish long A is different from what's common in English, German, Italian or other comparisons. The A-sound in English "far" or "bar" is about it.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hank.leigh

Definitely the hardest sentence so far. The rhythmic stress is difficult for me to get down fluently.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NanaM3

I'm not sure if it is actually ''I eat'', because i still think it's ''I ate''

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

It is "I eat".

"I ate" is "jag åt".

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NanaM3

now it does make more sense, thanks! :)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
  • 22
  • 18
  • 7
  • 2

So are en and ett like masculine and feminine type of words similar to romance languages?

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonEnMiljon
JonEnMiljon
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

Yes, it's a bit like that... 'en' words are called common gender (Swe: 'en-ord' or 'utrum' or 'reale'), and 'ett' words are neutral gender (Swe: 'ett-ord' or 'neutrum'). The common gender is a fusion of once existing masculine and feminine genders, a simplification that took place in the late middle ages (the three gender system remain in a couple of very special dialects with few speakers, though). 75-80% of all nouns are in the common gender but unfortunately there are not a lot of rules out there to make it easier to decide if a word is an en-ord or ett-ord...

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shainachana

The audio makes it sound like "äpple" has the emphasis on the last syllable. Is that right? Like "eh puh LEH"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

No, äpple is stressed on the first syllable.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HastaLaVista83

Well, for learners of the Swedish language it indeed does sound as if the stress was on the last syllable. So far the same goes for "kvinna" and "flicka".

The reason for this is the so-called accent 2 (at least in German it's called like this), which is also existent in Norwegian (only in part?).

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/henryshao7

Funniest and most challenging sentence so far....

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aquneknight

Is there a way to slow down the audio?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

I guess it depends on how you are using Duolingo. The web version for standard computers has an extra button for slow audio. The Android and iOS versions may not have this.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RidwanHihi

so, en is for persson and ett is for object?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

More or less, but there is no rule to it and it has to be learned with every noun.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SalmanBinHabib

what is the past tense of ater or swedish of ate?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Åt.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/floppet
floppet
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 5

What's the difference between ett and en?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Each noun is either en or ett and it has to be learned with the word.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harthacanute

Where can I find conjugations of Swedish verbs?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noaghi
Noaghi
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3

Is it like in French, in which we can use the infinitive verbs to mean a continuous situation?

Just like "Je mange" - I eat/I am eating.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

I think you mean the present tense rather than the infinitive (which is manger), but the answer is yes. Swedish doesn't differ between present simple and present continuous the way English does.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George1317

how is "the apple" ?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonEnMiljon
JonEnMiljon
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5

the apple = äpplet

1
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George1317

thanks :)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ben756416

Shoulden "Jag äter ett äpple" be i am (i'm) eating an apple

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

That's one possible translation.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adam75440

It should be translated "I am eating an apple"

1
Reply4 months ago