"Jag litar på min son."

Translation:I trust my son.

3 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JANBOEVINK
JANBOEVINK
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The Esslte dictionary gives as primary meanings for -lita på- -depend on- and -rely on-. That was the translation I would have used had not DL suggested -trust-. I actually think -trust- is not a really good translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoakimEk
JoakimEk
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Personally, I disagree. I think those are closer to "förlita sig på" or "vara beroende av". I checked my Prisma dictionary, it translates "lita på" to "have confidence in, trust [in]". The first of those I'd probably translate to "ha förtroende för".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I agree with you, but I guess Jan decided to rely on the dictionary rather than trust the course builders :P

Edit: Now that I took a look further ahead in the thread, there's a later comment from Jan precisely about how one can't always trust dictionaries. Of course one can't always trust this course or its creators either. :)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GWYNNETHHAUXWELL

Could we not say "Jag tror min son"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, that'd be "I believe my son". It doesn't really have the same meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlecHirsch1

What about "Jag tror på min son"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I believe in my son.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taigha
taigha
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is litar pronounced the same as letar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, long E and long I are not the same. See the examples here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_phonology

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taigha
taigha
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Thanks for your response! So the long E is pronounced roughly as we would in english as in "feet", while the long i is pronounced completely differently from how we would ever pronounce anything in english? (almost like you're smiling while saying it, I don't know how to describe it)

Here is a recording of me saying it just to make sure I'm pronouncing it correctly: http://vocaroo.com/i/s1DVV0SzsbOs

Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, long I is as the long EE in "feet". Think of long E as in "dear".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaoloLim
PaoloLim
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In this logic, if we want to translate "He trusts his (own) lawyer", do we say "Han litar på sig advokat." ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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No, it'd be Han litar på sin advokat

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalizou

What about ''Han litar på hans advokat'' is that correct as well? If not, what's the difference between sin/hans?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Han litar på sin advokat = he trusts his [own] laywer.

Han litar på hans adrokat = he trusts his [someone else's] lawyer.

The difference is whether the possessive pronoun refers back to the subject or to someone else.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalizou

Thank you all (Zmrzlina, HelenCarlsson and the other admins) not only for responding to our questions.. but for being here, sacrificing your precious time without waiting for any consideration (however small it may be)... What abnegation! Humanly impressive :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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<3!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Glad to help!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalizou

Tack för ditt svar

I am still confused! You know, last week I went to work using my brother's car, a colleague of mine asked me if it's mine (car)? I said that it belongs to my brother, and then he said: ''hans bil''

I wonder why he didn't say ''sin bil'' ?

Almost all my colleagues (swedish but not teachers) say that both are interchangeable!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Sin/sitt/sina is used only when the noun belongs to the subject of the sentence:

Det är hans bil - Han kör sin bil
Hennes hus är rött - Hon tycker om sitt röda hus
Deras hundar äter kött - De ger sina hundar kött

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Another example:

Björn talade med grannen om sin bil (the car belongs to Björn)
Björn talade med grannen om hans bil (the car belongs to the neighbour)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathonAustin

why på? Wouldn't that be "I trust in my son"?. Is it really necessary to include på?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Lita på is a phrasal verb meaning "trust in/on".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taigha
taigha
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You have to keep in mind that when learning a new language, some things don't translate directly to english, especially with prepositions. Sometimes verbs will use prepositions that to us don't make sense if you translate them directly english, like in this situation, but it will actually be grammatically correct in that language. In this case "att lita på" means to trust.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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As far as I know, you can't use "lita" without a particle. "Lita till" is possible as well, but "lita på" is more common.

There is also a noun tillit, which means faith, reliance.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacqueline180776

Hei jag har en liten fråga här. Är det någon skillnad mellan ''litar på" och "litar till"? Tackar!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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litar till is used in the sense 'rely on'. E.g. Jag litar till min intuition 'I rely on my intution'. Still, förlita sig på would be more common for that meaning.

I found this description online that I think captures the difference:

Reliance is the notion of actually needing someone in order for you to do something. It might be relying on someone for emotional support, or a sportsman relying on a peer to achieve their goal.

Trust is the notion of predicting that the person in question will do the right thing. It might be trusting someone to keep a secret or do something that they said they would.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JANBOEVINK
JANBOEVINK
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Another issue you have setled impressively, Arnouti! Thanks. By your statement the Esselte dictionary got it wrong on this issue. It is unwise to believe dictionnaries are always right.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/panglossa
panglossa
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I hear 'son' as /zon/ here, is that correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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It shouldn't be (we don't have voiced "s" in Swedish), but since "n" is a voiced consonant I guess it could affect the following sound.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/panglossa
panglossa
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I imagined something like that... but does it really occur, or is it just here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rasla143
Rasla143
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How do you say when you have trust on your teachers if I try "jag litar på mina lärare" is this sentence correct?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Priscilla885382

How do you translate "I depend on my son?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JANBOEVINK
JANBOEVINK
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Hi Priscilla. A nice question I realised I could not answer. My dictinary says: - bero på-, -vara beroende av - or -vara hänvisad till-.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Priscilla885382

tack.....

5 months ago
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