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  5. "Flickan äter glass."

"Flickan äter glass."

Translation:The girl eats ice cream.

November 18, 2014

99 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merriam-Webster

After completing this sentence, I am so glad "glass" is not a cognate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blehg

In case it might be of interest, "glass" comes from French "glace".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/French_Bunny

Yes : just "glace" We (french people) barely but sometimes say "crème glacée". Just "ice" is refused by duo. Is "Ice cream" the only coorect translation in English ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

Yes. "Ice" refers only to frozen water. And "Italian ice" is an unrelated dessert.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RhiaBOX

Interestingly, "is" in Danish refers to either ice, or ice cream! O:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MintyNinja41

Something similar happens in German, where Eis can mean either ice or ice cream, depending on context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucxsor

In Portuguese, "ice cream" is "sorvete", which means nothing at all s2


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elif_melissa

I think we just learned "ice cream" in all languages XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

But we have sorbet in Swedish which is sorbet in English too. I looked it up and it comes from a Turkish word. But it's not used for ice cream in general, only for this special type (frozen fruit/berries/juice, water, sugar, no milk or cream).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbet
https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elif_melissa

In Turkish , its "dondurma" :D and "dondur" means freeze :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elif_melissa

In Norwegian its "iskrem" and "is" means "ice" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucxsor

Oh, that's really interesting! Living and learning, I guess. Here, it's used for any sort of ice cream, really.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lidewan

In Chinese, it is "冰淇凌(bing1 qi2 ling2)”. And "冰” means ice, in this character "水” means water. "淇凌(qi2 ling2)" is a transliteration of cream. But what ingenious is that "淇" and "凌" also mean "ice, snow".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lagolas2010

In russian, "ice cream" is "morozhenoye" which is "frozen", an adjective which is used as noun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginger.Flush

Hahahaha Brazilian here too... But I gotta tell you that sorbet is a type of ice cream... Like italian gelato... Sorbet doesn't have milk/cream... So it's not the same thing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/citronbulcina

in latvian "ice cream" is "saldējums" and "saldēt" means "to freeze" so it kinda makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geesemouse

In Japanese, we use an english loanword and say アイスクリーム (aisukureemu), but usually just アイス.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SariahLily

In Spanish ice cream is either helado (frozen) or nieve (snow). I shall have snow for dessert! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

@daguipa: Mexico, according to Wiktionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

In which Spanish speaking country does 'nieve' mean 'ice cream'? I've never heard of it before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tastysquidgey

I'm curious, where in France do they say crème glacée? Because I live in the Limousin and I've never heard it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LonelyLatinLover

C'est surtout sur les pots de glace, ou les personnes âgées qui disent crème glacée, personne ne le dit autrement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lau_Coco

Au Québec, nous disons toujours crème glacée et jamais glace!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiomarv7

And the French "glace" comes from the Latin fifth declension noun "glacies," which means "ice." Latin lives on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weird_Ed

I actually thought about it but wasn't sure.. Thanks for the info;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PapaSmurf88

Just to clarify, you are referring to glass as in the see-through material that we use for windows and similar objects, and not the Swedish word, which means the same as ice cream?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/srgri

thanks, I was confused about its etymology


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lau_Coco

Oh thanks, French is my native language! This tip will help me remember the swedish word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eb.maria

Nice information haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeesKiwi

To make it even more confusing, "glas" means "glass"!


[deactivated user]

    I haven't reached there yet, but do they sound alike?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    Double consonants in Swedish mean that the vowel before them is short. So the vowel is long in glas and short in glass. In this case, the vowel also has a slightly different quality. You can listen to them here: glas vs glass


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MjesecC

    thanks a bazillion


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

    Huh, so it's like the opposite of the terminal "e" in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GastonDorren

    Yes, languages have many different tricks to distinguish between long and short vowels. English is unique (I believe) in adding the magic e.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

    @BrianSilvi:

    • Hot - hottie
    • Log - logger
    • Trap - trapper
    • Rub - rubbish
    • Star - starry
    • Tin - tinny
    • Tan - tanner
    • Don - donner
    • Big - bigger
    • In - inner

    Without terminal "e", I'm not seeing it at all, sorry. Each of those pairs' initial vowels are all pronounced the same, at least in my dialect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

    @BrianSilvi Fair enough, I guess that's true. But I'd argue with pairs like staring - starring, taping - tapping, scraping - scrapping, tiling - tilling and the like, that's still due to the terminal "e": see stare, tape, scrape, tile, etc. It's just a rule of English orthography that subsumes the "e" into the "ing" in progressive tense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianSilvi

    For the most part, English does the same thing with single vs double consonants indicating preceding vowel length.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianSilvi

    Oh I wasn't saying the silent e had nothing to do with this. I'm just saying that's how it works with pronunciation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeesKiwi

    They are similar, but the sound the "a" makes is slightly different if I recall correctly


    [deactivated user]

      I got to glas later on. It makes more of a long o sound in that case. In the most unprofessional way to describe it


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

      Yes, the difference between short and long vowel in Swedish is length AND sound, so for each vowel you'll need to learn one short sound and one long sound.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexisLinguist

      Yes, it is. I'll have to hear it again, but it sounds lower to me, in glas.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MjesecC

      I'm gonna have a hard time over these xD


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexisLinguist

      Yes, now I can say "I love eating glass" to people, and freak them out...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amuzulo

      They'll just think you're a foreign who loves ice cream. :-P


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreeMediaKids

      That is exactly why I came here. Come to think of it, if you take glass, grind it up with a hammer into small chunks of shards, put some in a cereal bowl, pour some milk in it, pick up a spoon, scoop it into the bowl to put the milky shards on that end of the spoon, draw it into your mouth to chew and swish those sharp milky shards (visualize that, do not just think about it), and then push that into the back of your mouth also referred to as the pharynx and push it in a downward motion to swallow that deliciousness, you can safely expect excruciating pain as well as an unforeseen drop in blood pressure due to blood loss caused by the points of the shards. Verbose, but better.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nils.Morlind

      glass may not be a cognate, but glas is


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prokacper

      Glass isn't but glas is ;)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PapaSmurf88

      I agree. I had almost the exact same thought when I saw this.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjb518

      This raised an eyebrow before I looked at the translation for glass!

      "Ahhh, ice cream. Yeah, that makes much more sense."

      I thought the course creators were just being quirky for a moment.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InternetUser

      I was thinking, "First she eats pepper, now she eats glass? I want to meet this girl."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJ1230

      Don't forget about drinking oil. :" )


      [deactivated user]

        Nej, Mannen dricker olja (No, the man didn't drink oil, I haven't learned how to say "it was the man who didn't drink oil" just yet)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

        Det var mannen, vem drack inte olja?

        ...maybe?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

        Close, "Det var mannen som inte drack olja."


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliceIn-Wo

        Who can blame you when they bombard you with sentences about drinking oil? :p


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spudmcloughlin

        I was thinking "the girl eats glass??" And then i remembered "glass" is "ice cream"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Yveltal-

        you can imagine the look on my face...


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

        False friend detected!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bassirou_Camara

        It's is like in French. La glace.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

        Yes, it's a loanword. :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

        LOL... and then there's zmrzlina.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoannaGlap

        I thought it would be really "The girl eats glass" haha


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpjoseph

        I was surprised when I saw this sentence. Why would a little girl eat glass? But thank goodness glass=ice cream. Wait, why does glass=ice cream?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

        I guess it's from the French word "glace".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

        This is duo lingo, where words are pulled at random and context does not exist. I can't say I blame you, when the German course made me translate "I swim in milk"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/APerson398103

        I didn't ever get to translate that one in german, but there were some weird ones for sure


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

        More than fifty comments on a three word phrase :)! I wonder if the course creaters expected that.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

        I don't think it ever crossed my mind that glass could cause such confusion. :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fathersulls

        I got so scared omg


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrfreitas.

        Can I say "Flickan har glass"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

        If she has some ice cream, sure. Doesn't mean she's eating it like in this sentence, though.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrfreitas.

        Oh! So, there ain't no relation between have and eat in Swedish, right?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

        Nope. To have lunch for example will always be "att äta lunch". And let's not have the lunch/middag discussion here again :D.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChineseHamster

        What's the difference in pronunciation between "glas" and "glass"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anass90

        Your question has been asked before and answered by Arnauti, so I just copied it. Double consonants in Swedish mean that the vowel before them is short. So the vowel is long in glas and short in glass. In this case, the vowel also has a slightly different quality. You can listen to them here: http://sv.forvo.com/search-sv/glas/ vs http://sv.forvo.com/search-sv/glass/


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/santiago922752

        Glass is just ice cream? Isnt it for beverages too?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

        No, just ice cream. A glass for beverages is ett glas. Spelling and vowel length matters!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

        It can be a mass noun yes, but "en glass" works too (for a stick or a cornet).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

        why does Swedish have French cognates?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiomarv7

        You can attribute that to Latin. Both the French "glace" and Swedish "glass" come from the Latin word for ice, which is "glacies."


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

        how does Latin contribute to Swedish? I know it's a Germanic language but how did Latin influence get in there?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiomarv7

        Around the tenth century AD, Christianity made its way into Sweden. The converts in Sweden shared cultural ties with the rest of Europe including the official language of the Roman Catholic Church: Latin. As a result, Latin and Greek loan words made their way into the language.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

        It is more because of the French cultural influence in Europe until the second World War. The political language was French, The elites in Europe spoke French ( even the English ). Sweden had Napoleon's general Bernadotte as king. French nobility married into Swedish nobility too.Then the Brits and the USA won the war and France lost it. And the english-speaking USA took the overhand. Sic transit gloria mundi, amicus meus.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

        Actually, Swedish contains a lot of Latin and Greek loans from way before French ever became the lingua franca. However, glass specifically was loaned from French like you say. :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Audi683301

        I know "glass" is ice cream and "glas" is glass but is the pronunciation the same?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plantersnigel

        No the A has the short sound in Glass and the long sound in Glas. The first is like "glace" said in French, the second is more like if you said the sound "glaahs" in English. Like the British pronounciation of "vase".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarionGeorge

        what is the phonetic difference between glas and glass


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plantersnigel

        Check out my comment on the post by Audi683301


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BioJess

        Is there a way to say "the girl eats ice" without being cofused for "the girl eats ice cream"? My toddler likes to eat ice when teething, and people who are ill often eat ice instead of drinking water.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

        Sure - ice is is in Swedish, and ice cream is glass. So they're very, very hard to confuse. :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

        Great example of "false friends"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlinaIvano6

        In Romanian is "înghețată" (which is frozen) and in Italian is Gelato.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

        Gelato and ice cream aren’t necessarily the same thing. That’s the word for it, but how it’s made is very different.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mladen163451

        In Serbian ice cream mean frozen cream. But we say "Sladoled" it's mean "sweet ice"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik3harps

        "The girl is eating ice cream" is also correct.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwainLlyfr

        Yes.

        Wasn't it accepted?

        Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.