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  5. "Vogliono colpire di notte."

"Vogliono colpire di notte."

Translation:They want to strike at night.

November 18, 2014

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto_Didactyl

Imagine a robbery or a military action


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith352848

I shouldn't have to imagine it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/murcat1

The Vampire Union


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

Special ops Duo. :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

La notte dei morti viventi!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puzzle36714

Or rival gangs warfare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitzanms1

Perché usano "di" qui, invece di "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mary_505

Because generally in this case it is "di" with days and "a" or "a+article" with hours: di martedì, di giorno, di notte, di pomeriggio; a mezzogiorno, alle due, alle sedici e trenta, a mezzanotte. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto_Didactyl

I am not a native speaker but it appears the answer may be - that's just the way it is done. di notte seems to be a standard construction, whereas a mezzogiorno or alle nove or even a 9 seem preferred.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cave_felem

Aaah, Duolingo is teaching us Mafia Italian again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nevica11

What does this mean?? Sorry, I don't get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

You probably don't watch enough thrillers. :D

Just imagine a team of thieves who want to rob the bank. Or a team of plotting cats who plan to plunder the fridge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nevica11

But "striking at night" is not even colloquial English. Is there a better translation than this. "Reaching out into the darkness" perhaps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruckelhaxan

Interesting that it's the same verb for hitting someone and for committing a crime. Italian doesn't cease to fascinate me :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ihrma

Yeah funny to say it like this....colpire= to hit....right? Italian language is full of surprises for me :) (....I guessed this one right....)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarySeltze

Could "strike" also refer to a labor strike?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

That would be "un sciopero".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

You're absolutely right. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pennyellen65

There is no such thing as italian english;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uxSY4nUr

https://it.wiktionary.org/wiki/colpire says that colpire is a transitive verb. What does it mean without an object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

I am not an expert in grammar, but I think in this sentence "colpire" is being used as a noun (a nominal infinitive); the object of "vogliono". Since it is not being used as a verb, "colpire" does not need an object. Perhaps someone else can confirm this reasoning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

On second thoughts, perhaps a simpler explanation is that the object of "colpire" is 'understood' (from the context). For example, two soldiers are talking: "The generals are going to attack the enemy." "When?" "They want to strike (the enemy - understood) at night."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uxSY4nUr

I'd rather understand colpire as an intransitive verb here (but I may be wrong, just learning Italian). In German this would be Sie wollen bei Nacht zuschlagen: here the verb zuschlagen is intransitive (as in https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/zuschlagen at meaning [2]), whereas schlagen is transitive in most of its meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

You might be right, but I can't find a single dictionary that lists it as intransitive, even dictionaries that give example phrases where colpire has no explicit object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XyloPiano

Tonight we strike, tonight we strike, no one's safe so the time is right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkuczmik

generale duo ma chi? i bambini morti o le formiche dello zucchero?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DASTOW

Can 'colpire ' also mean strike in the 'withdrawal of labour' sense??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

There is no sound. Mr. DL please have a look into this. Thanks

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