"En kopp te"

Translation:A cup of tea

November 18, 2014

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/funtaco

Ah, I guessed "a tea cup" because I didn't see an "of" in there.

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

It appears to be like Welsh in which the word order implies the "of" used in English. It's almost like an adjective: a green shirt = a shirt of green = crys gwyrdd

In Welsh "cath Elin" lit. cat Elin means Elin's cat or the cat of Elin.

Neither is better or right or wrong, they are each how that particular language deals with conveying a concept.

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Skoldpaddor

Is this a cup filled with tea or a teacup? I know French makes the distinction between une tasse de thé and une tasse à thé. I'd assume it's the former, but you never know.

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Aileme

It's the cup filled with tea. A teacup is called tekopp.
http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tekopp

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmanuelChigbata

I would have asked the same question as Skoldpaddor. Thanks for the clarification.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgaagnpe

Is there a word for "of" in Swedish?

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

For which one of the ofs? :-) English uses "of" for several different concepts. In this sentence the "of" essentially means "filled with", and a great many languages (see above) leave it out in that position entirely. Then there is the "of" like in "thinking of", which is sometimes expressed as "about". I believe, that would be "på" in swedish. (Native speakers, please correct me :-). Then there is the "of" as in "selecting a subset", e.g. in "one of the cats is sleeping". (En av katterna sover). That would be "av". I am quite sure if we keep looking we will find a couple more "of"s.

The morale - prepositions are almost entirely arbitrary in many contexts, and therefore need to be learned and translated in context. (and that is true for most languages that have had any time to develop apart, there are examples of that even between dialects of the same language)

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Synthpopalooza

But then there is this sentence ... Din kopp är full av te (your cup is full of tea) ... I have seen "av" used in this sense.

March 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Wurstobier

And then there is "Min svävare är full med ål" ;-)

June 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elana1818

ROFL. Have a lingot!

September 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

"there are examples of that even between dialects of the same language" English example: Brits say "at the weekend" and Americans say "on the weekend"

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zyriel

You're example makes me think of the dropped (or extra) article in "go to hospital" (British) versus "go to the hospital" (American). That one has always stood out for me.

June 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

In British English, using the definite article would mean you're talking about a particular hospital and would always be followed up with "to do such and such/see someone/attend an appointment". When one says "I have to go to hospital" it implies that the speaker will be an in-patient and can be followed by details of the procedure.

Thanks for raising this, I've never thought about it before!

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DelosangelesT

"A cuppa" should be correct

March 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Seriously, please try to stay a little closer to the norm in your answers. If you want every colloquial expression in all varieties of English from all over the world to be accepted, there will just be no end of work for us poor contributors. If you speak English in the first place, you probably know that a cuppa tea is also known as a cup of tea.

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveHopki

Think this was a lighthearted joke.

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Sorry it's hard to tell when people are joking or not. You should see some of the suggestions for accepted answers we get…

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveHopki

I can imagine, haha.

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

In which case I apologise for submitting "a cuppa"! In my defense, it's a very wide spread colloquialism....

<grovels in apology>

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GrowingViolet

Is it just me, or am I hearing two syllables in "te"? How should this word be pronounced?

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

It's just one syllable, with a long E.

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting

I'm also hearing 2 syllables (3 months later): it sounds like /i/ and schwa.

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/luissntclra

Well spotted. A long 'e' in Swedish is followed by a subtle schwa.

August 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bladewright

It's like...tije

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/katt64

If I can say: "En kopp te" to mean: "A cup of tea". Can I say: "Ett glas vatten" to mean: "A glass of water" or something like that?

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yup, that's the way we say it.

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tgabriel77

So, "a glass of tea" isn't right?

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, a glass is not a cup. :)

  • glass = glas
  • cup = kopp
May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tgabriel77

In portuguese they have the same translation: "copo". :)

Thank you!

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/luissntclra

Well, these are actually not the same in Portuguese.

glass: copo
cup: xícara

You got confused with the false friend. ; )

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ShayneSund

its not fair that they don't say 'of ' . :(

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

It's not fair that English does say of. :(

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/gmcope321

Just being curious, how would you say "I would like a cup of tea" in a restaurant?

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Jag skulle vilja ha en kopp te.

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zacharias10161

I know its old, but is "A spot of tea" still being used?

September 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1

In certain places, yes....

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/futureswedish

How can you know when to put a cup and the cup?

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

"En kopp": "A cup".

"Koppen": "The cup".

You'll find out why later in the course.

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ambl97

Is it said that I'm excited about finding out why? I love linguistics.

January 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/helloolleh

why not a cuppa

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

scroll up ^

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ofcourse.

what about: a cup tea?

February 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, English requires the preposition.

February 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronJohns686245

Is "koppe" also used for the unit of measurement?

February 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

You'll find kopp in older recipes, but it's virtually not in use anymore.

Also, a Swedish kopp is not the same unit of measurement as a cup, so that's a common pitfall when translating recipes!

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalieBoa3

Why does en refer to kopp in this sentence instead of ett being used to refer to te?

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Grammatically speaking, you're asking for the cup. It just happens to be filled with tea. :)

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Saza29

Would you say in a cafe en kopp te , tack or is that not used like that

December 12, 2018
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