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"Jag har på mig en tröja under jackan."

Translation:I wear a sweater under the jacket.

0
3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tommy_Buckley

For UK English, its more commonly referred to as "jumper" instead of sweater for Tröja, As far as I know both Jumper and Sweater are the same thing.

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anrui
Anrui
Mod
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Please report this

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Note that "to wear" = "att ha på sig", where "på" should be stressed. This is not really the case with current voice (Nov 19, 2014).

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/illumillama

Is it only "har på mig" when referring to yourself and "har på sig" when referring to others? Or can "sig" be used here too?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Jag har på mig
Du har på dig
Han/hon/hen har på sig
Vi har på oss
Ni har på er
De har på sig

38
Reply43 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/illumillama

Tack! :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javakaffe

is 'under' a loan word?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ezkertia
Ezkertia
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It's native to Swedish and comes from Proto-Germanic. Cognates in other Germanic languages include English under, German unter, Dutch onder, and Icelandic undir.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schyrsivochter

I think it’s originally Germanic, as the meaning shift from originally “between” (cf. Latin inter) to “under” happened in German and English too. In German, the original meaning is preserved as a prefix in some words: unterbrechen (“to under-break”, meaning “to interrupt”), Unternehmen (“under-take”, meaning enterprise) – hey, they are direct translations from their Latin/French/English counterparts!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NattKullav1
NattKullav1
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Can "jackan" here translate to "my jacket"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Yes.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scylok

So directly translated does this not mean "I have on me a sweater under the jacket"? Because it was incorrect for me.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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Word by word, that's what it means! But "have on me" is not proper English, right? "Am wearing" sounds so much better :).

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thetoadwart

I'm not sure why "jersey" is not valid for "tröja"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenCarlsson
HelenCarlsson
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You can report it and A&A can have a look!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SunnySundquist

Jag har en fråga. The pronunciation sounds like, "Jag har´ på´ mig" rather than "Jag´ har på´ mig" Is this typical stress when using that phrase. Hope you understand what I am asking...

0
Reply4 months ago