"Smörgåsen"

Translation:The sandwich

November 18, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/moore.scott24

How about a buttered-goose sandwich?

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hcarleton

So what is the difference between smörgås and macka? I used to think smörgås was an open sandwhich and macka was a regular sandwich, but that does not seem to be the case. Are they just interchangeable?

June 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yup, macka is just a colloquial word with the same meaning.

June 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

Isn't "macka" more Sweden Swedish and "smörgås" more Finland Swedish? (At least that's what I was taught in school)

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

They probably use macka less in Finland then, but in Sweden, I'd say smörgås is the normal word and macka the colloquial word.

September 15, 2015

[deactivated user]

    And to complicate it even more, Swedish Wikipedia article about "smörgås eller macka" links to English Wikipedia's "open sandwich" (https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sm%C3%B6rg%C3%A5s), while en-wiki "sandwich" links to sv-wiki "Sandwich, dubbelsmörgås eller dubbelmacka" (https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandwich) ...

    January 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alyssa643725

    Remember when we could make her talk slowly like a normal person? The good old days...

    March 7, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/km1

    Are the pronunciatons of "Smörgåsen" and "Smör gåsen" (Butter the goose) identical?

    November 18, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/cc08_

    Both are spelled Smörgåsen, but the pronunciations are different. Smörrgåssen vs Smöörgååsen

    BTW, the robovoice mispronounces this word. Listen here: http://www.forvo.com/word/sm%C3%B6rg%C3%A5s/#sv

    November 18, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/calhob8

    I believe butter the goose would be smöra gåsen. Smör gåsen translates into the butter goose.

    November 18, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/km1

    I believe "Smör gåsen" is the imperative (command form) meaning "Butter the goose!"

    November 24, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/calhob8

    That would be "smöra gåsen!"

    November 24, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

    Yes, that is correct.

    May 20, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kalle935336

    Rather in the case of "Han smör gåsen" would be "He is buttering the goose"

    March 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Harryeswri1

    This is only making me hungry

    July 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/NindeHyper

    Excuse me, what is the difference between smörgåsen and smörgåsar? My book says the last one is sandwhich as well...

    January 8, 2015

    [deactivated user]

      Smörgåsar is the (indefinite) plural. Smörgåsen = the sandwich, smörgåsar = sandwiches.

      January 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11

      How would one say 'the sandwiches' (plural)?

      May 20, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

      Smörgåsarna.

      May 20, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11

      Thank you kindly! Here, have a lingot. :D

      May 21, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/Isabellg1

      Smörgåsen= one Smörgåsar= sevrals

      April 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/fischerfs

      So are 'ett' nouns changed to -et and 'en' nouns to -en in their 'the [object] forms?

      July 12, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
      1. It's not a question of object vs. subject, it's a question of definite ('the') vs. indefinite. 2. You need to consider number (sing vs. plural) as well, so there are four forms for each en noun and four forms for each ett noun. 3. Singular definite is not always -en or -et, sometimes you add just -n or -t. 4. The -n ending is used for the singular definite of en nouns, but it is also used for the definite plural of some ett nouns (eg.: barn/barn/barnet/barnen)
      July 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/olof494087

      Isabellg har rätt för smörgåsen=one Smörgåsar=sevrals.

      December 20, 2015
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