"Älgen sover i natt."

Translation:The moose is sleeping tonight.

November 18, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander_Rais

På skogen, den mäktiga skogen, älgen sover i natt.

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/freeboprich

Åwimbaway, Åwimbaway, Åwimbaway, Åwimbaway...

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucas820491

åwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiawimbawayvaaaa

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

There is actually a Swedish translation of the song! It goes:

Mitt i djungeln, den stora djungeln
Där sover lejonen

Which is easy to change to moose just going for "skogen" and "älgarna" instead. :D

And by the way, forests aren't really considered mighty in Swedish. Mäktig is used with actual power or sometimes with very rich desserts. :)

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander_Rais

The mighty chocolate mousse. I like it. (And thanks for the correction!)

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/makmegs

Why haven't we been taught "the LION sleeps tonight?"

April 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Moose are the kings in the North! All hail Moose!

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlSailor

Norden har ingen kung men nordens kungen som heter älg!

The north knows no king but the king in the north whose name is moose!

November 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlecHirsch1

Could this also mean "The moose sleeps at night" As in, the moose in an animal that is active during the day and sleeps at night?

September 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

No, in that case you'd use "på natten"

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanBaer

In the village, the swedish village, the moose sleeps tonight

May 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelDav835885

Is inatt synonmous with ikväll?

February 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, natt always refers to the night, and kväll always to the evening.

February 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/amateurasu

Couldn't this also mean "The moose will sleep tonight."? I thought that was a thing, where using the "currently doing" form of a verb, but referring to a future time, turns it into a "will do".

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

It's true that the present can be used to tell the future, but - as in English - it only really works where it makes idiomatic sense to do so. Otherwise, every single present-tense sentence in this course would have to have future-tense translations.

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/amateurasu

It wouldn't be every present-tense sentence though, right? It would only be the ones that also specify a time in the future.

I mean, is there a distinction between "The moose sleeps tonight" and "The moose will sleep tonight", and this sentence can only mean one of them and not the other? If there is, I'd be curious to know what it is, since the sentence seems to fit the pattern of "will do" sentences as I described above. And if there is no such distinction, shouldn't both "sleeps" and "will sleep" be considered correct? If anything, "The moose will sleep tonight" sounds more normal to my American ear, and "The moose sleeps tonight" sounds like more of a dramatic/poetic way to say it, although both ways have essentially the same meaning.

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Fair enough, you have a point. :) Still, I would only think this sentence was about the future if that has been made abundantly clear through context, and it would honestly sound a bit strange even then. That's what I mean about it making idiomatic sense. It's grammatical, for sure, but hardly a feasible interpretation.

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/amateurasu

I dunno, I feel like "tonight" is most frequently used in a future context, to refer to the upcoming night, as opposed to, say, "today", which always refers to the present. If tonight in this sentence is in the present, then "The moose is sleeping tonight" sounds more natural to me. And if tonight in the sentence is in the future, then I'd probably go with "The moose will sleep tonight". "The moose sleeps tonight" just sounds... odd. It's hard to put my finger on why, though.

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Right, to be clear I'm talking only about the Swedish sentence. I would presume that it's currently night-time and the moose is currently sleeping.

That said, I agree that "is sleeping" would make for a better default. I'll change it. :)

December 20, 2018
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