"O lar"

Translation:The home

July 3, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moshira3

To emphasize ItaloMonteCosta and oupajohn: The comparison between lair (English) and lar (Portuguese) lies in the etymology (roots of meanings) of the words – It cannot be used as a translation.

The historical meaning of lair in English was a resting place. In modern English it is a dwelling (living and resting) place of a monster, or a wild animal – mostly of a predator. As I search my brain, it seems that you would not use "lair" to describe a home of a person unless you wanted to specifically compare it to that of an animal. In Portuguese it might not be used as often as casa, but it certainly does not have the connotation of the home of an animal/monster.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbwlove

Does anyone in brasil actually use this word often?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Not used so often.either house or home are translated as casa. Lar sounds more poetic to us


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaeOvHope

Would one refer to theil house they grew up in as "lar" and their adult residence as "casa", maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarlimanOfBree

"Lar. Lar é onde você pendura seu chapeu!" --Lord John Whorfin in the Portuguese version of "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaolaIeie

The Romans called "Lari" the divinities of the house and it was the first thing they would think about in case of danger or moving. Surely the Portuguese word come from there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brom4880

Interesting you should bring that up. When I'm learning new languages and don't know a word I always try to imagine if it resembles a Latin or Greek root word, and I immediately thought of "lair" which can also be a "den" which is a safe often hidden home (now part of a home traditionally a man's lair, den, or "man cave") and the definition of some masculine animal's cave homes like a lion's lair and a wolf's den. Makes it easier to remember that this can be a "home."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariejose74

I believe "fireplace" is another translation of "lar". But I can not find it right now. Anyone can clarify it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Fireplace = lareira


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano

The audio sounds like "o luar" instead of "o lar".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CairaDeb

Maybe house is casa and home is lar. For example, we have what we call "home department" in English as in business terms i guess. Which possibly wouldn't be translated 'departamento de casa' but instead "departamento de Lar." That's if I'm not mistaken.

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