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  5. vill ha -> want (to have) ?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonhardtS1

vill ha -> want (to have) ?

I think 'want to have' (not just 'want') should be allowed as a translation of 'vill ha' in most of the cases. Sure, maybe 'want' is the more appropriate translation BUT I'm pretty sure you can use both. Or take it the other way around: How would you translate "I want to have sth."? 'Jag vill ha någonting' is the most appropriate translation imo.

November 18, 2014

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

This is a pretty old thread now, but in case anybody comes here, I've written some more about vill ha here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5892480


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

I am sure you mean "Jag vill HA någonting" :) and yes that is how I would translate "I want to have something" as well (or maybe the short "något" instead of "någonting").

Do you mean that for example "Jag vill ha en hund" can only be translated to "I want a dog" and not to "I want to have a dog", and that you want both to be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonhardtS1

Args, always the infinitive after auxiliaries.... don't know why I keep making this mistake ;). And yes. I meant that :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, we should allow that, but remember that "I want a dog" is the best translation of "Jag vill ha en hund", because you can't skip the "ha" in that Swedish sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Jag är säker på att du inte VILL HA en lingot, men du får en ändå.

I am sure that you don't want(!) a lingot, but you get one anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Szczepanovich

"Jag vill ha någonting" is the proper translation, but other than that, it seems to me that you're right. I haven't seen the sentences you're talking about, but I think you should report them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonhardtS1

Edited it. And I reported all of them until now ;)

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