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  5. "Se upp för dörrarna."

"Se upp för dörrarna."

Translation:Watch out for the doors.

November 18, 2014

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dsgoo

... dörarna stängs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/22879

Why is this "Se upp för dörrarna" but another example is "se upp med den där björn"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aktungmak

tåget går mot akalla...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wxfrog
  • 1654

Those Stockholm T-Bana doors are merciless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Torniojaws

Riddarna på ovädret


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James490940

Kom på spädbarn, ljus min eld


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaTheLeaf

I put "be careful of the doors" which to me is the same thing. Marked wrong, of course!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steph.Ro

In English you can say "Be mindful of the doors." or "Be careful with the doors." I'm not sure either of these is allowed, though, as the wording is quite different from the Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vesa29985

Can someone explain a situation where I can use this sentence? I am thinking about two situations:

  1. There is a door "threatening" you, for example if it is a revolving door or a glass door and you don't see it (in this case why it is in plural?)

  2. You are shopping and ask your friend to mention if they find doors to buy. But in this case I would use "look for" or "search" in English (I'm still learning that too)

So can this sentence mean both cases?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rvnbrd

It's used on the subway when the doors are closing "Se upp dör dörrarna. Dörrarna stängs."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I wouldn't use either of the "accepted translations" spontaneously in speech. I'd say, "watch your head." What a curious anglicism!

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