"Nej,menhundenkanhenteenknivtildig."

Translation:No, but the dog can get a knife for you.

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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That's some fetching skills the dog has.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wtrdavies
wtrdavies
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'til' and 'for' are often used to mean 'for' (in English). When am I supposed to use each one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/londoncallling

I feel like 'til' has a sense of actual motion (i.e. the dog is carrying the knife over to the person) whereas 'for' would have a sense of purpose (i.e. the dog is getting it on the person's behalf). Can anyone confirm whether that makes sense or am I totally barking up the wrong tree?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivanyutin
ivanyutin
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I do not know for sure, but I feel what you suggested is not always correct. For example, we had a sentence in one of the early lessons about the hat, sounding like a woman was buying a hat for her husband, i.e. without any actual movement: "Hatten er til min mand"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucas97628

Sounds about right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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So looking around more since this seems to be a question that's come up a few times, I think I have the answer: 'for' is used to express a purpose and 'til' is used in just about every other case where you'd want to express «for» in English. What that means practically is:

«Hun købte blomster til sin mor» - She bought flowers for her mother [as a gift].

«Hun købte blomster for sin mor» - She bought flowers for her mother [on her behalf].

In English we only have the one preposition, so we both the above sentences translate to "She bought flowers for her mother" but miss the crucial parenthetical information. Danish, like Norwegian,Spanish and some other languages, use different prepositions for the different scenarios.

If I've misstated anything, hopefully a mod or a native speaker can correct me.

I hope that helps.

Cheers.

Edit - Changed from Norwegian to Danish. I was thinking in Norsk when I read the question. See, the languages really are that close!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
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Although the concept is pretty much the same, just so people know, that's Norwegian, not Danish. The Danish would be "Hun købte blomster til/for sin mor"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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LOL. D'oh, I was doing Norwegian when I saw the email float by and I was just in that frame of mind. Let me correct that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlinstantkarma

I would love to hear the sentence preceding this response.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martinsspiegel
Martinsspiegel
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I also would like more guidance regarding Danish prepositions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Respro
Respro
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Hunden er tjener eller trælkvinde

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonkotsuLover

"Hente" vs "få"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cOOlaide117
cOOlaide117
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wat

4 years ago
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